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Old 11-26-2017, 05:34 PM
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Bored5000 Bored5000 is offline
Eddie S.
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Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Fleetwood, Pa.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by samosa4u View Post
When coming up with this list, I had to look at two things: price and popularity. Pele's Quigol and Alifabolaget cards are more popular than the Crack Maradona. Both of these cards also cost a lot more as well. This is the reason why this card did not make the list. Even Pele's Titulares #86 card ranks higher than the Crack Maradona.

As a collector, I am confused as to what we can call a Maradona rookie card. It looks like he had quite a few cards issued in the late 1970s in Argentina. At first I wanted to go after his Crack, but then I saw his 1977 Arg Jrs. disc. By the way, can a little disc even count as a card? It also looks like he has a few other cards from 1978 as well - it's all very confusing! None of them has come out as the winner. At least with Pele, collectors agree that anything of his which was manufactured in 1958 can be considered his rookie.



This is true. The Quigol is clearly the winner of the two.

The story behind this card is just crazy though. I was speaking to a big Pele collector and he told me that his Quigol Pele sold for only $20 USD back in 2003 on eBay! I also had a chance to purchase a beautiful PSA 5 example a couple years ago for around $4,000 USD, but I thought the seller was out of his mind - oh, how I regret walking away from it! Anyhow, the value has just exploded over the past few years. Any seller who owns this card, especially in mid to high grade, can ask for big money and get it.
The explosion in value of the Pele Quigol card is similar to what David Peck talks about elsewhere on the board with regard to the landmark 1982-83 Wrestling All-Stars sets. Peck has mentioned on here before that he bought his first PSA 9 Hulk Hogan card from that set for $50 in 2009 or 2010. The Hogan card is now a $2,500 card in that grade.

Peck also mentions on here often that he never would have believed he would see high-grade commons selling for $1,000 from those sets (the PSA registry is quite a drug ).

I collect far more for fun than as something I hope to make money off of, but that is also at least part of the reason why I love non-sports cards and cards outside the big four sports. There seems to be a lot more possibility of a card exploding in value as new collectors become aware a particular card exists than what there is in baseball cards. The iconic baseball cards of the hobby have been pricey for a long time.

Last edited by Bored5000; 11-26-2017 at 05:49 PM.
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