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  #1  
Old 08-25-2017, 11:59 PM
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vintagebaseballcardguy vintagebaseballcardguy is offline
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Default Do any of you like graded cards for building/storing postwar sets

I really don't intend for this to be another tired graded vs. ungraded thread, but in looking at 60s football sets I want to build, I see that many of them are relatively small and manageable, especially compared to many baseball sets from the same period.

I have always liked the idea of a binder but find myself growing a little leary of them when it comes down to actually doing it. I do have a set in a toploader binder and another set in Cardsaver I s in a Unikeep via 4 pocket pages. Both of these set ups are ok but a little clunky at times.

I am not someone who has ever been big into grading, but last year I bought a complete set that was 100% graded and a large partial of another set...again all graded. From a uniformity and storage standpoint, I am surprised to find myself really, really liking it. My emerging OCD likes the way the cards look in the slabs in those white boxes. I can take them out, stack them, lay them out beside each other, flip through them quickly, etc. The cards and their attributes will always be way more important than the holders in which they reside.

I also started looking on the bay at cards from sets I am interested in and found that in some (not all, but some) cases that PSA/SGC 6- 7 or so graded cards are not that much more expensive than their ungraded counterparts. Not interested in registries or anything like that, but I just view slabs as a means of a decent holder for cards and a reasonable means of storage. I know some don't like how heavy graded cards can get. This hasn't been an issue for me.

Anyone else find graded cards convenient for these reasons?

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  #2  
Old 08-26-2017, 07:57 AM
jefferyepayne jefferyepayne is offline
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For me the value of graded cards is in the guarantee of authenticity and protection against damage. Grading is so subjective that if you are not careful, you will often buy the grade instead of the card so I try hard not to judge the card solely by the number on it.

For small sets, I agree it is pretty easy to look at it if the cards are graded. For large sets, not so easy. This is one of the reasons I prefer raw cards in binders for my post-war sets. I like the ease of pulling out a binder and being able to flip through it without having to deadlift it to pick it up

Pre-war sets I have are mostly graded for protection and most are very small in size so easy to look at that way. Besides, it's pretty difficult to find pre-war cards that AREN'T graded these days so most cards I buy are already graded anyway ... I haven't submitted more than a handful of cards to TPGs in my entire life ... I've cracked out a lot more than I've ever had graded.

Good topic for discussion!

jeff

Last edited by jefferyepayne; 08-26-2017 at 07:59 AM.
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  #3  
Old 08-26-2017, 08:59 AM
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Originally Posted by jefferyepayne View Post
For me the value of graded cards is in the guarantee of authenticity and protection against damage. Grading is so subjective that if you are not careful, you will often buy the grade instead of the card so I try hard not to judge the card solely by the number on it.

For small sets, I agree it is pretty easy to look at it if the cards are graded. For large sets, not so easy. This is one of the reasons I prefer raw cards in binders for my post-war sets. I like the ease of pulling out a binder and being able to flip through it without having to deadlift it to pick it up

Pre-war sets I have are mostly graded for protection and most are very small in size so easy to look at that way. Besides, it's pretty difficult to find pre-war cards that AREN'T graded these days so most cards I buy are already graded anyway ... I haven't submitted more than a handful of cards to TPGs in my entire life ... I've cracked out a lot more than I've ever had graded.

Good topic for discussion!

jeff
Jeff, if nothing else happens, I hope to generate some discussion here. I hear you loud and clear on all points. I do not buy flips for the sake of the number. Grading, as you asserted, is highly subjective. I have seldom ever submitted anything for grading but will buy cards already graded. In my prewar baseball exploits, I have cracked out many cards in the 2-5 range and have placed them in a binder, and they look awesome. The lithography and the style of the tobacco card backs appeal to me arranged as such. In that particular instance I am able to place the tobacco cards in a penny sleeve and toploader made for tobacco cards and they fit perfectly into pages made for small Bowmans.

Going back to standard size, higher grade 60s football, I have found no such systen that I am satisfied with to this point. So the graded aspect appeals to me in that instance. The card within is of much greater importance of course. The protection, uniformity, and organization are what appeal to me the most.

You mentioned size of set playing into this. I guess that is relative. After collecting 60s baseball with 598 card sets, the football sets of the 60s all look pretty small, relatively. To me a 220 card 1961 Fleer set all graded wouldn't be that big of an issue by comparison, and 62 and 63 Fleer with 88 cards each would be even more doable. These later two sets would each fit perfectly in a two row storage box.

Like you said though, one had to be really careful not to simply buy the flip when buying graded cards. Even if I pursue this, I will still stick to the same standards I always have. Thanks a lot for your reply!

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  #4  
Old 08-26-2017, 09:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vintagebaseballcardguy View Post
I really don't intend for this to be another tired graded vs. ungraded thread, but in looking at 60s football sets I want to build, I see that many of them are relatively small and manageable, especially compared to many baseball sets from the same period.

I have always liked the idea of a binder but find myself growing a little leary of them when it comes down to actually doing it. I do have a set in a toploader binder and another set in Cardsaver I s in a Unikeep via 4 pocket pages. Both of these set ups are ok but a little clunky at times.

I am not someone who has ever been big into grading, but last year I bought a complete set that was 100% graded and a large partial of another set...again all graded. From a uniformity and storage standpoint, I am surprised to find myself really, really liking it. My emerging OCD likes the way the cards look in the slabs in those white boxes. I can take them out, stack them, lay them out beside each other, flip through them quickly, etc. The cards and their attributes will always be way more important than the holders in which they reside.

I also started looking on the bay at cards from sets I am interested in and found that in some (not all, but some) cases that PSA/SGC 6- 7 or so graded cards are not that much more expensive than their ungraded counterparts. Not interested in registries or anything like that, but I just view slabs as a means of a decent holder for cards and a reasonable means of storage. I know some don't like how heavy graded cards can get. This hasn't been an issue for me.

Anyone else find graded cards convenient for these reasons?

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Most of my sets are less than 200, so I pretty much grade them all and store them in those hard boxes (that take roughly 40 SGC cards and even more PSA cards)... I prefer it this way. Al
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  #5  
Old 08-26-2017, 11:20 AM
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Most of my sets are less than 200, so I pretty much grade them all and store them in those hard boxes (that take roughly 40 SGC cards and even more PSA cards)... I prefer it this way. Al
That would work well for graded cards.

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  #6  
Old 08-26-2017, 12:36 PM
clamendo clamendo is offline
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I've actually been thinking about this. I would grade all the early and popular sets, rare oddball sets. I think I'm going to put my other older sets in card savers for protection purposes and ease of storage, but grade the key cards(HoFers). The binders are nice but over time the pages curl and all it takes is one time for a binder to slide off a shelf and damage your cards and you'll wish you didn't .


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  #7  
Old 08-26-2017, 01:48 PM
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Originally Posted by clamendo View Post
I've actually been thinking about this. I would grade all the early and popular sets, rare oddball sets. I think I'm going to put my other older sets in card savers for protection purposes and ease of storage, but grade the key cards(HoFers). The binders are nice but over time the pages curl and all it takes is one time for a binder to slide off a shelf and damage your cards and you'll wish you didn't .


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I have done the Cardsaver for commons and graded stars in boxes method as well. This could be an alternative to all graded. Just out of curiosity, are you comfortable with Cardsaver I s for long term storage? At one time, I used and liked the CardSavers, but some folks on the baseball board scared me off. Any thoughts about toploaders instead (with or without penny sleeves)?

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  #8  
Old 08-26-2017, 03:30 PM
jefferyepayne jefferyepayne is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vintagebaseballcardguy View Post
You mentioned size of set playing into this. I guess that is relative. After collecting 60s baseball with 598 card sets, the football sets of the 60s all look pretty small, relatively. To me a 220 card 1961 Fleer set all graded wouldn't be that big of an issue by comparison, and 62 and 63 Fleer with 88 cards each would be even more doable. These later two sets would each fit perfectly in a two row storage box.
I hear you on this point! A definite advantage of collecting football cards if you are a set collector is the size of the sets. Compared to baseball they are tiny.

It most definitely makes it more doable to build graded sets that you can actually pull out and enjoy. Once you get to the early 70s set sizes rose rapidly to 528 card that became the topps football set size standard thereafter for quite a while.

jeff
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  #9  
Old 08-26-2017, 08:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jefferyepayne View Post
I hear you on this point! A definite advantage of collecting football cards if you are a set collector is the size of the sets. Compared to baseball they are tiny.

It most definitely makes it more doable to build graded sets that you can actually pull out and enjoy. Once you get to the early 70s set sizes rose rapidly to 528 card that became the topps football set size standard thereafter for quite a while.

jeff
Jeff, that's the truth! Those 60s baseball sets are endless! I have zero desire to ever do one of those again. To each his own, but 70s Topps football holds next to no appeal for me. A couple of designs are ok, but like you said the sets get larger, and I detest the airbrushing of the logos! Someday if I am fortunate enough to have the 60s sets I want, I may venture into the 50s for a couple of Bowman sets.

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  #10  
Old 08-26-2017, 09:33 PM
jefferyepayne jefferyepayne is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clamendo View Post
I've actually been thinking about this. I would grade all the early and popular sets, rare oddball sets. I think I'm going to put my other older sets in card savers for protection purposes and ease of storage, but grade the key cards(HoFers). The binders are nice but over time the pages curl and all it takes is one time for a binder to slide off a shelf and damage your cards and you'll wish you didn't .
Good point, Carl. Some of my newer stars are graded too for protection.

I'm REAL careful with my binders, though, LOL.

jeff
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