NonSports Forum

Net54baseball.com
Welcome to Net54baseball.com. These forums are devoted to both Pre- and Post- war baseball cards and vintage memorabilia, as well as other sports. There is a separate section for Buying, Selling and Trading - the B/S/T area!! If you give an opinion of a person or company your full name needs to be in your post. Contact the moderator at leon@net54baseball.com should you have any questions or concerns. Enjoy!
Net54baseball.com
Net54baseball.com

Go Back   Net54baseball.com Forums > Net54baseball Postwar Sportscard Forums > Postwar Baseball Cards Forum (Pre-1980)

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old 10-12-2017, 11:31 AM
steve B steve B is offline
Steve Birmingham
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: eastern Mass.
Posts: 4,280
Default

Pretty much all collectibles go through cycles, particular things are popular for a time, then people move on to other stuff. Some of that is interest, some of it publicity, some of it just changing opinions on what is worth something.

When I started, cards were just beginning to be "valuable" nearly every postwar card was relatively inexpensive. The 52 Mantle hadn't topped 1000, and a decent Aaron rookie was 60. Hardly anyone collected the few insert sets and obscure stuff was either dirt cheap or really expensive (for then)

I've been into collecting a lot of stuff over the years, some hobbies have grown, some have not.

Coins
Stamps
Old Bottles
Beer cans
Telephone/telegraph insulators
Old radios
Old computers
Old bicycles
Action figures
Old books
Old magazines

All of them have seen some of the same things since the mid-late 90's. I've seen it called the Ebay effect.
Before Ebay, a lot of that stuff had value even for the relatively common things. (Old computers being the exception, they weren't old enough for the usual yard sale crowd. ) So you might see one reasonably nice old radio or bike a year if you went to yard sales and flea markets. More often if you were really into it and went constantly. So you bought what you could find at what seemed like a reasonable price.
Once Ebay got big enough you could find nice stuff a lot more often. Like anytime you felt like looking. And pretty soon people caught on to just how common the common stuff really is. That's true for any hobby. And once you realize that you can buy a perfect or near perfect example pretty much whenever you want to, there's no need to buy the lesser ones.
Late 90's I did pretty well buying boxes of late 80's cards for almost nothing, and selling lots of 100-400 for a few dollars. (Not counting the time I spent, which is only one reason I stopped) By say 2005 those lots wouldn't sell as well. Maybe half the time or less instead of nearly every time. People interested in random lots realized they could just buy complete sets, or much larger lots for less per card. Now there's a lot of "cheap" singles listed, commons I'd maybe want a few cents for listed for $1. Because when you need one card, it's easier to just buy it even of it's massively overpriced because in the end, it's just a dollar.

The really good stuff either continues to be really good with ups and downs, or it essentially goes into hiding until the prices come back up. (Old computers were very pricy for a while because all the dotcom guys were buying up the stuff they learned on or had as kids. )

Most hobbies never really die, they just change.

Steve B
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 10-12-2017, 12:36 PM
silvor silvor is offline
member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 15
Default

Interesting thread and things to think about since I am back into card collecting.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 100backstroke View Post
Coins have cooled in last few years, trend looks to continue.
I got into coins a little bit the past few years attending coin shows mostly for the junk silver. When silver was pushing $50, the dealers would say there were more bullion buyers than regular coin buyers at the shows. They mentioned how they hoped they would stick around after the coming crash. It looks like most didn't, which isn't surprising.

My kid plays baseball but has no interest in the cards. But, he is BIG into the Pokémon cards. Some of the graded "vintage" (1999) cards go for CRAZY money. Some kids still collect, just different things I guess.

Last edited by silvor; 10-12-2017 at 12:37 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 10-12-2017, 01:22 PM
Neal's Avatar
Neal Neal is offline
Ne@l K
Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: US
Posts: 876
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by steve B View Post
Pretty much all collectibles go through cycles, particular things are popular for a time, then people move on to other stuff. Some of that is interest, some of it publicity, some of it just changing opinions on what is worth something.

When I started, cards were just beginning to be "valuable" nearly every postwar card was relatively inexpensive. The 52 Mantle hadn't topped 1000, and a decent Aaron rookie was 60. Hardly anyone collected the few insert sets and obscure stuff was either dirt cheap or really expensive (for then)

I've been into collecting a lot of stuff over the years, some hobbies have grown, some have not.

Coins
Stamps
Old Bottles
Beer cans
Telephone/telegraph insulators
Old radios
Old computers
Old bicycles
Action figures
Old books
Old magazines

All of them have seen some of the same things since the mid-late 90's. I've seen it called the Ebay effect.
Before Ebay, a lot of that stuff had value even for the relatively common things. (Old computers being the exception, they weren't old enough for the usual yard sale crowd. ) So you might see one reasonably nice old radio or bike a year if you went to yard sales and flea markets. More often if you were really into it and went constantly. So you bought what you could find at what seemed like a reasonable price.
Once Ebay got big enough you could find nice stuff a lot more often. Like anytime you felt like looking. And pretty soon people caught on to just how common the common stuff really is. That's true for any hobby. And once you realize that you can buy a perfect or near perfect example pretty much whenever you want to, there's no need to buy the lesser ones.
Late 90's I did pretty well buying boxes of late 80's cards for almost nothing, and selling lots of 100-400 for a few dollars. (Not counting the time I spent, which is only one reason I stopped) By say 2005 those lots wouldn't sell as well. Maybe half the time or less instead of nearly every time. People interested in random lots realized they could just buy complete sets, or much larger lots for less per card. Now there's a lot of "cheap" singles listed, commons I'd maybe want a few cents for listed for $1. Because when you need one card, it's easier to just buy it even of it's massively overpriced because in the end, it's just a dollar.

The really good stuff either continues to be really good with ups and downs, or it essentially goes into hiding until the prices come back up. (Old computers were very pricy for a while because all the dotcom guys were buying up the stuff they learned on or had as kids. )

Most hobbies never really die, they just change.

Steve B
I remember those days where a Mantle was 1K. I remember seeing one at "Joe's Dugout" and couldn't believe the ridiculous price lol

Big difference was that we were collectors then. Not too many kids who think like we did.
__________________
Neal

Successful transactions with Peter Spaeth, Brian Van Horn, Brian Dwyer, MGHPro, canofcorn, Zigger Zagger, conor912, RayBShotz, Jay Wolt, AConte, Halbig Vintage and many others

May have to check into the Whitey Ford clinic for cardboard addiction
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 10-12-2017, 01:38 PM
drcy's Avatar
drcy drcy is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 1,782
Default

Elvis Presley rare record prices have dropped, and Greta Garbo and Rudolf Valentino autographs (once prizes of the hobby) fell off before that.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 10-12-2017, 01:43 PM
OsFan OsFan is offline
member
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 135
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Neal View Post
Personally, I believe that baseball card collecting is slowly and surely becoming a dying hobby. Certainly less and less .....

I have coached Little League for many years. These kids know Trout and Jeter, but do not know about Johnny Bench. Babe Ruth is certainly known, but only as legend. Foxx? Walter Johnson? George Brett? Nope.

but like all the kids that I know at his age, they simply do not collect. Most never did in the first place.
While I mostly agree with your assessment and it makes me sad more than anything. I do have a rebuttal to one of your arguments.
No one on this board knew the average player from the early 1900s when they were growing up and later learned about them and now collect early tobacco cards. I may be wrong about that.

But I will agree with you that most kids these days (at least from what I’ve seen and I have two myself) don’t collect much of anything. So in that regard the hobby may not have a great future.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 10-12-2017, 01:45 PM
OsFan OsFan is offline
member
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 135
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by drcy View Post
Elvis Presley rare record prices have dropped, and Greta Garbo and Rudolf Valentino autographs (once prizes of the hobby) fell off before that.
True but vintage record sales overall have made a huge leap in the last ten years. Who knows if that will last?
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 10-12-2017, 02:13 PM
aconte aconte is offline
Tony Conte
member
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: NJ
Posts: 143
Default Sell!

Top tier HOFERS will always do well.

50's and 60's commons could drop like rocks.

Last edited by aconte; 10-12-2017 at 02:15 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 10-12-2017, 04:25 PM
1952boyntoncollector 1952boyntoncollector is offline
ja.ke liebe.rman
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: http://www.psacard.com/PSASetRegistry/alltimeset.aspx?s=175000&ac=1
Posts: 3,842
Default

Threads like this always get a lot of traction.

Everybody always worried...but yeah lots of low level stars....if POP isnt super small..most people wont know who they are later on..

If you see record highs on the big big cards...that doesnt mean much for the rest of the market...
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 10-12-2017, 04:32 PM
Exhibitman's Avatar
Exhibitman Exhibitman is offline
Ad@m W@r$h@w
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Beautiful Downtown Burbank
Posts: 5,981
Default

Here's the thing: the kids today are going to be the inheritors tomorrow of the cards we are saving today. Some of them will be enchanted by the hobby and will get into it, just as some collectors on this board got their starts with their fathers' old cards.

The stuff cycles. I have some cards that still haven't rebounded to their pre-crash price levels, when I bought them. And it isn't just cards. Check the spot price on silver lately? I remember trading some cards for silver bullion at a National a few years ago when silver was about twice its current price. D'oh!
__________________
Please visit my web site: www.americasgreatboxingcards.com
I believe that the immaturity, social deficits and emotional deficiencies that unite us are so much greater than the political gulf that divides us.
So... move out of your studio apartment! And try speaking to a real live woman, and GROW THE HELL UP! I mean, it's just baseball cards dammit, IT'S JUST BASEBALL CARDS!

Last edited by Exhibitman; 10-12-2017 at 04:34 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 10-12-2017, 04:57 PM
JollyElm's Avatar
JollyElm JollyElm is offline
D@rrΣn Hu.ghΣs
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 2,856
Default

It's all about the phones. Every single minute of every single day the youths of today are staring down at their phones. No one seems to even go outside and play anymore. If it's not something that appears on their phones, there is virtually no interest from a huge percentage of kids. When I was growing up (jeez, I sound old), every kid in class had at least some baseball cards. It was an absolutely huge part of the culture, but these days there are a bazillion other distractions for kids, so collecting takes a back seat...waaaaaaay in the back.
__________________
Check out my bucket(s). Virtually everything is available for trade:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/152396...57685904801706
http://s1226.photobucket.com/albums/ee404/JollyElm/
http://s1036.photobucket.com/user/elmjack44/library/

“I was such a dangerous hitter I even got intentional walks during batting practice.”
Casey Stengel
Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Card values mybestbretts Postwar Baseball Cards Forum (Pre-1980) 7 10-09-2016 04:46 PM
Help on authentic graded card values whelenfan Net54baseball Vintage (Pre-WWII) Baseball Cards & New Member Introductions 7 01-16-2015 04:04 PM
card price trend by grades/condition Econteachert205 Net54baseball Vintage (Pre-WWII) Baseball Cards & New Member Introductions 6 08-06-2014 01:21 PM
Current trend in E card difficulty? goudey1933 Net54baseball Vintage (Pre-WWII) Baseball Cards & New Member Introductions 15 05-07-2012 09:41 AM
Confused on Card Values?? Archive Net54baseball Vintage (Pre-WWII) Baseball Cards & New Member Introductions 9 11-17-2007 04:07 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:00 PM.


ebay GSB