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  #1  
Old 04-26-2017, 08:51 AM
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LuckyLarry LuckyLarry is offline
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Default Netflix Documentary "Sugar Coated"

I struggle with my weight bouncing between 185-205 I know this is not good for my health. If I gave up this fight, I probably would be 225+ pounds. Sometimes I can’t stop jamming crap down my throat, sweets are my downfall LOL. This year my annual physical revealed my glucose level is high which is of concern since my dad was a diabetic. I’m 63 years old and very active. I use a Fitbit tracker and get on my elliptical, and also walk to get my 15,000 steps most days.

On one of the podcasts I listen to, the host got diagnosed with diabetes. He totally gave up sugar, seems better health wise, and lost a ton of weight. It seems the only life style change he made was giving up sugar.

Then I watched the documentary “Sugar Coated” currently streaming on Netflix. Investigating the food industries use of sugar, comparing this to the lies the tobacco industry told us during the 60s.

So I tried “cold turkey” (same way I quit smoking in 1983 LOL) off sugar. I am watching my carb intake too as carbs break down into glucose (sugar) I think. I got below 200, then blew right through the 190s and this AM weighed 187. I have been doing this same thing (up and down weight gain/loss) for YEARS.

I remember the “fat-free” craze back in the day. I ate so many “snack-well” cookies lol. Atkins of course I had good results with that, but ended up right back where I was, eating all that bread I crave so much.

I’ve never really been much of a fast food eater. But I could put away a pint of Ben and Jerry's every night, maybe two a day lol. DQ Blizzards, Sonic Blasts, and I don’t ever get a small, it’s only a bit more $$$ for a large!

Have you seen this documentary?

Larry
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Old 04-26-2017, 08:54 AM
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i have not seen this yet...but sugar is the scourge! It's just so tough to avoid and its soooooooo good!!!!! I have similar issues with my weight see-sawing from 180ish-high 190's...mainly because I stopped exercising stupidly. But when I avoid sugar...the weight just falls off!!!!!!
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Old 04-26-2017, 09:54 AM
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About a year ago I noticed that a number of my buddies all of a sudden were being diagnosed as "pre-diabetic". Then my wife's friends. All of a sudden it seemed like every other person we know was hearing this. There was an article in the NY Times this year about this phenomena, and doctors debating whether its real or not. I'm not saying to ignore any of what you are hearing, but this pre-diabetes stuff has gotten a little crazy I think.

I do avoid sugar. But once in while the siren call of swedish fish and gummy bears gets too strong.

Last edited by Snapolit1; 04-26-2017 at 09:55 AM.
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Old 04-26-2017, 12:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snapolit1 View Post
About a year ago I noticed that a number of my buddies all of a sudden were being diagnosed as "pre-diabetic". Then my wife's friends. All of a sudden it seemed like every other person we know was hearing this. There was an article in the NY Times this year about this phenomena, and doctors debating whether its real or not. I'm not saying to ignore any of what you are hearing, but this pre-diabetes stuff has gotten a little crazy I think.

I do avoid sugar. But once in while the siren call of swedish fish and gummy bears gets too strong.
There seems to be more and more of these diseases/disorders popping up all the time.
I have diverticulitis (For those that want to know: http://www.emedicinehealth.com/diver...article_em.htm) and it is the reason I am off of work today.

3-4 years ago, I had my first attack and I had no idea what was going on? Long story short, after being off work 4 1/2 months, heavily medicated, for a majority of that time, I now only have flare ups, like today, and a couple weeks ago.

When I seen a specialist, he told me this use to be an old mans disease/disorder but year after year, the people coming in, more frequently, to see him are getting younger and younger. He also informed me more and more women are also now getting this.

Not sure if it's one particular thing, but my gut tells me it is everything we are now eating and the air we are breathing. Hormones in food, MSG, the list goes on and on.

I try to control it the best I can with diet, and it has worked, for the most part, but the only thing to get rid of it is to have an operation. I have considered it, but there is a slight chance (3-5%) that I will have to wear a colostomy bag the rest of my life too!

Last edited by irv; 04-26-2017 at 01:17 PM.
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Old 04-28-2017, 08:25 AM
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Steve: Or maybe it's another example that Americans need to change the way we eat?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Snapolit1 View Post
About a year ago I noticed that a number of my buddies all of a sudden were being diagnosed as "pre-diabetic". Then my wife's friends. All of a sudden it seemed like every other person we know was hearing this. There was an article in the NY Times this year about this phenomena, and doctors debating whether its real or not. I'm not saying to ignore any of what you are hearing, but this pre-diabetes stuff has gotten a little crazy I think.
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Old 04-28-2017, 09:14 AM
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Oh I don't doubt that at all. But I also think as medical tools are getting finer and finer, and tests are getting better, things are being identified as "problems" where people have been living with them for years. Take cholesterol levels. Over the last three decades the standards of what is high bad cholesterol have steadily fallen. Why? Why was my cholesterol perfectly fine for 1980 but now considered high?
A decade ago my wife was diagnosed with some dubious "pre-cancer" situation. Took heavy duty drugs for years. Now the condition she was diagnosed is not considered "pre" anything. Doctors just realized that they hadn't seen this before because they didn't have the tools, and now it is ignored.

Last edited by Snapolit1; 04-28-2017 at 09:15 AM.
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Old 04-28-2017, 09:18 AM
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Good points.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Snapolit1 View Post
Oh I don't doubt that at all. But I also think as medical tools are getting finer and finer, and tests are getting better, things are being identified as "problems" where people have been living with them for years. Take cholesterol levels. Over the last three decades the standards of what is high bad cholesterol have steadily fallen. Why? Why was my cholesterol perfectly fine for 1980 but now considered high?
A decade ago my wife was diagnosed with some dubious "pre-cancer" situation. Took heavy duty drugs for years. Now the condition she was diagnosed is not considered "pre" anything. Doctors just realized that they hadn't seen this before because they didn't have the tools, and now it is ignored.
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  #8  
Old 04-28-2017, 10:18 AM
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Default Diverticulitis

Quote:
Originally Posted by irv View Post
There seems to be more and more of these diseases/disorders popping up all the time.
I have diverticulitis (For those that want to know: http://www.emedicinehealth.com/diver...article_em.htm) and it is the reason I am off of work today.

3-4 years ago, I had my first attack and I had no idea what was going on? Long story short, after being off work 4 1/2 months, heavily medicated, for a majority of that time, I now only have flare ups, like today, and a couple weeks ago.

When I seen a specialist, he told me this use to be an old mans disease/disorder but year after year, the people coming in, more frequently, to see him are getting younger and younger. He also informed me more and more women are also now getting this.

Not sure if it's one particular thing, but my gut tells me it is everything we are now eating and the air we are breathing. Hormones in food, MSG, the list goes on and on.

I try to control it the best I can with diet, and it has worked, for the most part, but the only thing to get rid of it is to have an operation. I have considered it, but there is a slight chance (3-5%) that I will have to wear a colostomy bag the rest of my life too!
I try never to talk medicine on the internet, but this is kind of my wheelhouse. The purpose of my response is to educate, as best I can. I'd like to make clear from the get-go that I am not refuting anything your specialist (I assume either a general surgeon or a colo-rectal surgeon) has said. I'm hoping my response might be of benefit to you and your understanding of your problem.

Diverticular disease, diverticulosis as it is known, or diverticulitis when inflammation/infection is present, IS a disease of diet. The human body is designed for high-fiber diet, which the western diet is not, hence the prevalence in our society as opposed to someplace like Japan. The colon has to generate pressure to move stool through it, and it is far easier on the colon to push a single, well-formed stool through then to push loose, low-fiber stool or diarrhea. Hence greater pressures are required for low-fiber stool. The colon, where both blood vessels and nerves perforate the wall, has areas where they are technically "weaker", and these are the areas that bulge out with higher pressures, aka diverticula. The sigmoid colon is far and away the most common site of diverticula, as it is the storage site for stool before defecation.

I would estimate 30-40 million people are walking around with diverticula. I also believe that our propensity to go to CT imaging much quicker now has to do with the increased finding of this condition.

Now on to diverticulitis. Of people who have a first bout, only 30% will have another. Of that 30%, only 30% will have another bout. So, you see, it is far more rare to have recurrence than not.

Diverticulitis used to be something where at your second bout, you would have the area resected, often with what is called a Hartmann's procedure (resection of the segment, bind rectal pouch and end colostomy, to be reversed in 1.5-6 months). Nowadays we treat it on a case-by-case basis, as some people are OK with intermittent flare-ups treated with antibiotics (cipro/flagyl or levaquin/flagyl or zosyn) and basically a liquid diet, whereas others are not. I will tell you this: the chances of you having a permanent colostomy (which is rare and mainly determined by the location of the disease) is exponentially higher if you need an emergency operation for serious perforation (Hinchey Class 3 or 4), as opposed to a planned, scheduled operation for resection when inflammation is not currently present. It is not unusual to have the segments re-connected and a diverting loop ileostomy brought up, to be reversed at a later time.

As a caveat, I perform this operation and am a general surgeon. I also have had a sigmoidectomy 3 years prior for perforated diverticulitis, so I've seen it from a patient's side as well.

I wish you all the best,

Tony Colacino
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Old 04-30-2017, 01:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corporal Lance Boil View Post
I try never to talk medicine on the internet, but this is kind of my wheelhouse. The purpose of my response is to educate, as best I can. I'd like to make clear from the get-go that I am not refuting anything your specialist (I assume either a general surgeon or a colo-rectal surgeon) has said. I'm hoping my response might be of benefit to you and your understanding of your problem.

Diverticular disease, diverticulosis as it is known, or diverticulitis when inflammation/infection is present, IS a disease of diet. The human body is designed for high-fiber diet, which the western diet is not, hence the prevalence in our society as opposed to someplace like Japan. The colon has to generate pressure to move stool through it, and it is far easier on the colon to push a single, well-formed stool through then to push loose, low-fiber stool or diarrhea. Hence greater pressures are required for low-fiber stool. The colon, where both blood vessels and nerves perforate the wall, has areas where they are technically "weaker", and these are the areas that bulge out with higher pressures, aka diverticula. The sigmoid colon is far and away the most common site of diverticula, as it is the storage site for stool before defecation.

I would estimate 30-40 million people are walking around with diverticula. I also believe that our propensity to go to CT imaging much quicker now has to do with the increased finding of this condition.

Now on to diverticulitis. Of people who have a first bout, only 30% will have another. Of that 30%, only 30% will have another bout. So, you see, it is far more rare to have recurrence than not.

Diverticulitis used to be something where at your second bout, you would have the area resected, often with what is called a Hartmann's procedure (resection of the segment, bind rectal pouch and end colostomy, to be reversed in 1.5-6 months). Nowadays we treat it on a case-by-case basis, as some people are OK with intermittent flare-ups treated with antibiotics (cipro/flagyl or levaquin/flagyl or zosyn) and basically a liquid diet, whereas others are not. I will tell you this: the chances of you having a permanent colostomy (which is rare and mainly determined by the location of the disease) is exponentially higher if you need an emergency operation for serious perforation (Hinchey Class 3 or 4), as opposed to a planned, scheduled operation for resection when inflammation is not currently present. It is not unusual to have the segments re-connected and a diverting loop ileostomy brought up, to be reversed at a later time.

As a caveat, I perform this operation and am a general surgeon. I also have had a sigmoidectomy 3 years prior for perforated diverticulitis, so I've seen it from a patient's side as well.

I wish you all the best,

Tony Colacino
Great information, Tony, thank you very much!

When I wrote what I wrote above, I was off work due to being constipated and in a bit of pain. I know that is definitely not an ideal situation when one is dealing with this disease, but it occasionally happens to me despite eating good, or at least thinking I am?

My last flare up I was given a prescription for 2 meds, Cipro and Flagyl, which I did not get as my Dr. (not my specialist) said to get only if I thought I needed them? Should I have gotten and taken them anyways?

I haven't seen my specialist in likely 2-3 yrs now, but I guess it wouldn't hurt to go for another check up/and a colonoscopy just to make sure everything is OK.

I have put off the operation but as I am getting older and plan on retiring in the next year or 2, the more I think about it, the more I think I should just go ahead? My specialist, Dr. Wolfson, is excellent, imo. His reviews are A+ and a couple of friends, who also have him, said the same thing so I know I am in good hands.

Question for you. If one decides to have the operation, can this come back on you? (I assume yes if you don't eat properly and take care of yourself) The reason I ask is, a person I know had this procedure done, and she informed me she still has some of it a higher up. I was wondering if she will eventually get as sick as she once was as I assume the diverticulitis will make it's way back down again? (Sorry if I am being ignorant, I just don't know?)

Thanks again for the great information! I appreciate it very much!
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Old 05-01-2017, 08:34 PM
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Default Here goes!

To answer your specific questions:

The combination of a fluoroquinolone (either levofloxacin (Levaquin) or Cipro (Ciprofloxacin) with the addition of metronidazole (Flagyl) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic regimen, with good activity against a majority of bacteria that would be causative in diverticulitis. I absolutely agree to not use these unless you need them. Why? They will suppress your normal colonic flora and perhaps you might wind up with an overgrowth of a different bacteria which normally inhabits your bowels, Clostridium Difficile come to mind (C diff). Plus, we are poor antibiotic stewards in general and by indiscriminate use we promote resistance.

Can it come back? Yes, and no. Bear in mind I have not examined you, and do not know the location of your disease. It is not uncommon to have disease "upstream" of the resected area which can become problematic, though this is rare. Some people have pan-colonic disease, i.e. disease all over there colon which make resection problematic, but most resections take place along known anatomic vascular supplies, and the colon is rich in arcades which co-distribute blood. Plus, this is not a cancer operation so the dividing of vessels takes place much closer to the colon, thus providing accessory blood supply. There are tenets to the operation which any surgeon would adhere to (Where are you Frank?) but generally I would resect the area in question and perform primary anastomosis, without diversion (think temporary bag.) My own pathology report shows they reconnected my bowels through a diverticula...I am fine.

Do you need another colonoscopy? No. Unless you like the prep, in which case I question your sanity. Colonoscopies, which I do, will not fix your issue, but maybe confirm it, and rule out malignancy as a cause.

Should you have an operation? Well, that's up to you. The body wants to get stool away from the site of inflammation and irritation, and if you want to try and avoid surgery I would recommend switching to clear liquid diet, something high in electrolytes like Gatorade when you experience significant symptoms like (I assume) serious left lower abdominal pain, and considering antibiotics if you run a fever or you think this may be serious. It would not be unusual to consider a CT scan at this point. Constipation I like to manage with Docusate Sodium (Colace), and over-the-counter stool softener. I usually prescribe 100 mg (2 50 mg pills) twice daily WITH water, as a stool softener doesn't work if there's no water to put into stool. I do not love laxatives in this situation, but would lean towards Senna as opposed to Miralax if forced. Cook all your vegetable well if you are experiencing symptoms, as you want things absorbed before they hit the colon. And for god's sake don't eat mushrooms, as the body does not absorb them, period, and they will irritate the hell out of your colon.

By the way, nuts/seeds/corn being bad for diverticula is a wive's tale. Bank on that.

OK, so long winded reply in a public place but there it is. I wish you health, good collecting, and if you have any issues feel free to contact me.

Tony
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