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  #11  
Old 01-10-2018, 09:00 AM
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bauce bauce is offline
Яоь
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1995 - Hideo Nomo: The beginning of the Tsunami that hit American Baseball. It was believed he was the first Japanese player to make the majors. However....

(Forgive them, for new collectors do not know what they say)

Thanks to the Boyd & Harris book Baseball Card Flipping, Trading and Bubblegum Book (1973) that proved this a tenant false and brought the 1965 Topps card #282 from a $5 common to a $40 semi-star status.
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Looking for one card for each of the following (SGC only):
e94 Blome's Chocolates
e98 Old Put Cigar
e99 Bishop & Co.
e100 Bishop & Co.
e104 Nadja
e105 Mello-Mint
e107 Breisch Williams

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aconte, brianp-beme, Luke
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  #12  
Old 01-10-2018, 09:06 AM
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Arthur
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Nothing in 1983 and 1984 was short-printed. Production numbers increased every year that period for all three companies.

Arthur
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  #13  
Old 01-10-2018, 11:27 AM
bigfanNY bigfanNY is offline
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Post 1980..
1981 I agree absolutely 3 sets!!! It was a big deal
1984 Donruss and Fleer were both tough to buy at local shop
1989 Upper Deck... All the early boxes I opened had 2 or 3 Griffey's
1994. Baseball Strike ... for a time America's least favorite pastime... the following years saw real reduction in card production.
1995 Upper Deck Be A player Hockey..An Auto in Every Pack!!
2009 The Mike Trout high value Rookie card era we still live in.
2016 Topps Now cards produced like social media snapshots..And Topps Transcendent 26k set????
All of it was fun to collect
Jonathan
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  #14  
Old 01-10-2018, 12:49 PM
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rats60 rats60 is offline
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1984 Fleer and Donruss were easy to find early in the year. Our local candy wholesaler had plenty of Donruss. Demand driven by Mattingly and Strawberry caused the product to dry up. Topps printed cards all year long, Fleer and Donruss didn't, so there was a perception that they were short printed. They were not, it was just that Topps was still delivering Topps to wholesalers into September/October.
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  #15  
Old 01-10-2018, 01:46 PM
steve B steve B is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rookiemonster View Post
Steve 1989 Fleer glossy is a parallel according to Beckett. The entire write up except the common flaws was taken from he Beckett site.

1984 Topps football was a a big deal due the rookie craze and the fact that it had a Marino and elway rookie. I don’t think the question was what was big at the time but most noteworthy.

LOL, I thought you meant the Upper Deck... Sometimes I totally miss things.
I see Fleer glossy as more of its own set, but it's interesting Beckett thinks of it as a parallel. How do they list the Nestles, and desert storm, and for that matter the tiffany and score glossy sets? They were all issued on their own in different forms.

Maybe, I saw the question as more along the lines of what was a big deal n a year and affected the hobby at the time and after.
All the other sports lagged behind Baseball until... I don't actually recall when. I know I bought older cards from other sports for very little right into the late 80's. The Marino and Elway were key cards, but hadn't taken off yet. Same for the Gretzky rookie. I got mine in lot that came in a monster box that just happened to have the whole set from that year. I think $50 for the whole box.

Now if I could recall just when everyone suddenly got interested in cards from the other sports, that would have to be a big hobby event.
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  #16  
Old 01-10-2018, 05:58 PM
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Rookiemonster Rookiemonster is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steve B View Post
LOL, I thought you meant the Upper Deck... Sometimes I totally miss things.
I see Fleer glossy as more of its own set, but it's interesting Beckett thinks of it as a parallel. How do they list the Nestles, and desert storm, and for that matter the tiffany and score glossy sets? They were all issued on their own in different forms.

Maybe, I saw the question as more along the lines of what was a big deal n a year and affected the hobby at the time and after.
All the other sports lagged behind Baseball until... I don't actually recall when. I know I bought older cards from other sports for very little right into the late 80's. The Marino and Elway were key cards, but hadn't taken off yet. Same for the Gretzky rookie. I got mine in lot that came in a monster box that just happened to have the whole set from that year. I think $50 for the whole box.

Now if I could recall just when everyone suddenly got interested in cards from the other sports, that would have to be a big hobby event.
Before 1992 I think parallel was more of a loose term. They had a bunch of Tiffany/glossy sets done before this one ( 1989 Fleer glossy). The thing is it has a Griffey rookie that is diffeicult to find in high grade because of factory issues. We can also add the 1989 Bowman Tiffany to 1989 cards that make a splash now. They made less Bowman Tiffany but there have been more high grades in the Bowman Tiffany then Fleer glossy. I was just adding to the fact that 1989 was a game changer. Without these other griffey rookies all we would have is a bunch of mass produced Griffey’s( like the upper decks never ending printing)


I also think that almost ever year from 1980 till now has some significance to the modern collector. So I was just cherry picking some big moments that popped in to my mind.
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  #17  
Old 01-10-2018, 08:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steve B View Post


Now if I could recall just when everyone suddenly got interested in cards from the other sports, that would have to be a big hobby event.
1989. Hoops with David Robinson and Score Football with Barry Sanders, Troy Aikman, etc. The first football Beckett was December 1989, Basketball March 1990, Hockey September 1990.
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  #18  
Old 01-10-2018, 09:59 PM
steve B steve B is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rookiemonster View Post
Before 1992 I think parallel was more of a loose term. They had a bunch of Tiffany/glossy sets done before this one ( 1989 Fleer glossy). The thing is it has a Griffey rookie that is diffeicult to find in high grade because of factory issues. We can also add the 1989 Bowman Tiffany to 1989 cards that make a splash now. They made less Bowman Tiffany but there have been more high grades in the Bowman Tiffany then Fleer glossy. I was just adding to the fact that 1989 was a game changer. Without these other griffey rookies all we would have is a bunch of mass produced Griffey’s( like the upper decks never ending printing)


I also think that almost ever year from 1980 till now has some significance to the modern collector. So I was just cherry picking some big moments that popped in to my mind.
Interesting take on 1989. And it does make sense, the UD cards were the big thing once they came out, along with the Billy Ripken.

And yes, there's probably something special that happened every year since 1980. Some more special than others, but that's more an individual thing. Like 83? when Topps sold uncut sheets rolled in huge "packs" through at least one of the chain toy stores. Special to me because it was a pretty weird thing to do even for Topps. But probably not so special to anyone else.
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  #19  
Old 01-11-2018, 08:01 AM
homerunderby homerunderby is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bauce View Post
1992 - beginning of the Insert-craze Era
I forgot about that, I remember the Topps Gold and the Fleer Rookie Sensations being popular, though if I remember correctly the Rookie Sensations were one per pack but the style of pack they came in was scarce.

When I think of "chase" cards I think of 1993 on to about 1999-2000 when attention turned to the game used. There were a few GU starting in about 1997 but there were so few that not many people had them.
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  #20  
Old 01-11-2018, 09:48 AM
slinger23 slinger23 is offline
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I have it down to 1993 and 2001.

1993 - The launch of SP Baseball and SP Football. Both products were incredibly popular plus the die-cut inserts were always in demand. That same year, we were introduced to 1993 Topps Finest baseball and the "refractor" craze was just beginning. Another brilliant product that took the hobby by storm. Inserts were a big focus, not only in these products, but others as someone else mentioned, but SP and Finest were HUGE!

2001 - Ichiro and Pujols drove the baseball card market. Low serial numbered cards and redemptions of either one of these two HoFers were HUGE too. Football was special too with Michael Vick (before his downward spiral), LaDainian Tomlinson, Drew Brees rookie cards hitting the market. I still remember opening a box of 2001 Topps Heritage and hoping for one of these studs, but ended up pulling the #2 overall pick, Leonard Davis. I still have the card, lol.

Anyway, there you go!
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