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  #21  
Old 07-14-2018, 07:54 PM
steve B steve B is offline
Steve Birmingham
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That's a big part of it.

I collected as a kid, mostly started in late 73, and the Hank Aaron cards showing all his earlier cards got me interested in older cards. Moved in late 77 to a place with a card shop.
T206s were 1.50 each for commons. And by the time I was working were maybe 2-3.00 That seemed pricy, as I only made a bit over 3 an hour.

Compared to now where a kid might make 7-8, but a vg common will usually be around 40. And other than the more common sets most prewar cards are pretty much untouchable (There's a bunch I still can't afford)
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  #22  
Old 07-14-2018, 10:34 PM
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DHogan DHogan is offline
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A few years ago, I picked up about 20,000 different cards from the 80's thru about 2010. Including Sports Illustrated going back to the late 80's I picked out the cards I wanted. I recently gave them to a 10 yr old friends son. He loved them. His family sat around the kitchen table for days checking and sorting them out. Even his 16 yr old sister pitched into help. Then a few weeks ago, I gave him my Topps sets from the late 80's and 90's all in binders. About another 5,000 cards. He was on happy kid.
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  #23  
Old 07-15-2018, 06:25 AM
Rich Klein Rich Klein is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ronniehatesjazz View Post
This is totally true. I think a lot of collectors don't quite understand how kids have been priced out of shops/shows. I remember going to shops when I was young and maybe you had a card or two above $100 but the vast majority of singles topped out at $20 or so... putting just about any card in reach for kids. Most shops I got into now have very few cards below $50 and most are north of $100. With packs it's the same story... most kids aren't going to be able to plunk down $50 for a pack of Tribute of Topps Museum. The shows are a totally different animal also than they were in the mid to late 90's where you'll see, almost exclusively, dealer after dealer with either expensive prewar and early postwar or insanely priced quad patch auto cards. A good chunk of kids still collect, they just do it at WalMart/Target or online. Nothing like the 80's but still most kids who play sports at least have a few hundred cards if not many more.
I'll disagree about shows -- because that may be true for the big shows and the large costs to attend but at my local show (40 tables or so) let me assure you we have many very affordable cards and very few expensive cards. And the dealer to dealer action is not as large as some shows.
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  #24  
Old 07-15-2018, 09:35 AM
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Next week, I'll be 51 years old. I started collecting in the mid to late 70s, with 80-83 being big years. Packs were 30 cents and local card shops were abundant with the occasional fire hall show. It was a blast.


Added to the collection during the HS and college years, and without eBay, the collection remained largely the same. Flash forward to the late 90s with eBay, the internet, message boards, and access to more spending money, the collection changed. Still is to this day ..


Now I am married, with two boys. One loves baseball and all sports and my youngest is a casual sports fan other than Philly teams. Neither collect, and I don't think any of their buddies do either. To me, that is the sign of a potential "apocalypse" for the hobby - none were 30 cent pack kids like most of us.

My neighborhood was teaming with kids back in the day whose daily summer activities included trading sessions. Some of them still collect, many do not.
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  #25  
Old 07-15-2018, 05:54 PM
AGuinness AGuinness is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich Klein View Post
I'll disagree about shows -- because that may be true for the big shows and the large costs to attend but at my local show (40 tables or so) let me assure you we have many very affordable cards and very few expensive cards. And the dealer to dealer action is not as large as some shows.
The one local show in Portland seems to have pretty decent turnout when I get the chance to go. Decent selection of mostly post war cards.

While some people have mentioned having a kid not into collecting or into collecting, I think it's good to note that in a number of big box stores by me that the latest issue of Topps doesn't seem to hang around for long before being sold out. And other venues for collecting (COMC comes to mind) seem to be flourishing (granted, COMC is also a marketplace for gaming cards, comics, etc.).

There's another thread on the board about the 2011 Topps Update Mike Trout at PSA 10 hitting $600, and what worries me more than kids losing interest is kids being priced out of what was a base card sold in packs. It seems crazy to think that if my 8-year-old was a big Trout fan, his "rookie" card would already be priced out for him - raw versions of this card are going for hundreds of dollars, including this example that has a wrinkle (!!!) (doesn't go directly to the card with a wrinkle, but you can still click on the link to access the original listing):

https://www.ebay.com/itm/2011-TOPPS-...p2047675.l2557

Last edited by AGuinness; 07-16-2018 at 12:00 PM. Reason: Clarify about the original listing link.
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  #26  
Old 07-20-2018, 12:03 PM
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I think Neal's post is spot-on; I have two boys as well, and neither are really baseball fans. The older is a "casual" at best fan, and really neither are interested in baseball cards really. The older one has a complete 1987 Topps baseball set he purchased for $15 at a local show, and I bought a box of Topps Opening Day for them last year to split (interesting that there were no duplicates, so the collation has greatly improved since I was collecting from packs from 1975-82).

Although both have gone with me to local card shows (hi Rich!), neither are really interested; the older likes vintage WW1 and 2 art cards and history stuff, and the younger likes Pokemon cards. I also don't see any young "kids" when I go into the local card shop, either; most are around my age or older, and many drop a "bundle" (at least from my perspective...heck, I spend less than $100 each year on cards) of $150+ on unopened boxes to get that "special" pull, autograph, or relic card. That seems to be driving the current, modern hobby, and as discussed elsewhere in this folder on the forum, new common cards are basically "worthless" or "junk wax" as was the case from 1986ish to 1995.

By the time I was 12, I already had completed the Topps 1976, 1977, and 1978 sets and was placing my order to buy a complete 1979 Topps set from a mail-order dealer for the first time rather than buying and completing by the pack.
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  #27  
Old 07-20-2018, 12:17 PM
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commishbob commishbob is offline
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The talk about the cost of shows struck a chord with me. I went to the latest TriStar show here in Houston. $12 to park and $15 to get in. I'm down $27 before I even see a table. I used to take my two sons to the big shows in town and even with the prices slightly lower in those days I was out $40 or so before walking in the door. Kids are scarce at the big shows, at least in my view.

OTOH I hit the hotel shows that a local dealer puts on once or twice a month (Hi Darryl) and all it costs me is gas money. I see young kids at those shows. In fact, I stood at a table and overheard a dealer practically give a graded card of the kid's favorite player to him. The youngster (and his hobby-novice Dad) were pretty excited. That dealer may have lost a few bucks on the card but he almost certainly made hobbyists out of that young family.
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  #28  
Old 07-20-2018, 02:08 PM
stevecarlton1972 stevecarlton1972 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neal View Post
Next week, I'll be 51 years old. I started collecting in the mid to late 70s, with 80-83 being big years. Packs were 30 cents and local card shops were abundant with the occasional fire hall show. It was a blast.
I'm 45 years old, so I collected on the same trajectory as you, but just a few years after. I started collecting around 1979, as the 80's were the big years of collecting for me.

I still say (and I may have posted this earlier in this thread or another tread), once those cards became a value for me, it all changed. When I was collecting back in 1981, 82, 83, 84, it was all about completing the Topps Baseball set each year. I didn't bother with Fleer or Donruss, or even other sports, I just wanted to complete that 792 card set for Topps each year. I would have traded a double of a 1983 Tony Gwynn Rookie back then for some common player to complete the set.

But once I saw a value on these cards (around 1986 when my friend told me about the Canseco Donruss Rookie) it was never the same. Then Upper Deck came around and cards started to skyrocket and they pretty much priced most kids out.

Less is more is the eventual downfall of kids not collecting because there are just too many sets today, and you have to be a real collector to know which is which. Back when I was a kid, I rode my bike up to Wawa or 7-11, bought a few packs of Topps Baseball Cards, and life was good.

Last edited by stevecarlton1972; 07-20-2018 at 02:08 PM.
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  #29  
Old 07-20-2018, 04:35 PM
G1911 G1911 is offline
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I'm younger than most here at 27. Collected as a kid, after my Dad bought me a few packs, never lost interest. I didn't collect in High School/College for economic reasons, but never really left the hobby. My dad, my uncles, my grandpa, all collected as kids. None of my cousins do, and most of my friends in my age group could care less about cards. My best friend is a great baseball fan and loves the history of the game, he'll take one of my boxes or binders occasionally and flip through the vintage, but doesn't collect.


I think it's largely because A) my generation is less collector oriented, B) has far more interest options than older generations did in the digital era, and C) my generation lacks the financial means to collect much. Many of my college classmates graduated with major debt, and struggle to live independently and build families, have little money to spend on hobbies at this point in their lives (which partly makes digital stuff more appealing, as here in Sillicon valley a smartphone and computer is basically a required item, and using them to spend time browsing the internet or playing free games costs nothing). I have been blessed to be able to responsibly spend some money on tobacco and vintage cards, but a lot more 45 year olds can do so than 25 year olds. I suspect many baseball fans will find the hobby later in life when it becomes more practical for them. And if it doesn't, that's one reason I don't spend much on any item. It's an aging market, and if it completely collapses one day, I want to still be happy with my modest collection and not feel like I lost an investment if they lose their value.
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  #30  
Old 07-21-2018, 04:01 AM
Rich Klein Rich Klein is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by commishbob View Post
The talk about the cost of shows struck a chord with me. I went to the latest TriStar show here in Houston. $12 to park and $15 to get in. I'm down $27 before I even see a table. I used to take my two sons to the big shows in town and even with the prices slightly lower in those days I was out $40 or so before walking in the door. Kids are scarce at the big shows, at least in my view.

OTOH I hit the hotel shows that a local dealer puts on once or twice a month (Hi Darryl) and all it costs me is gas money. I see young kids at those shows. In fact, I stood at a table and overheard a dealer practically give a graded card of the kid's favorite player to him. The youngster (and his hobby-novice Dad) were pretty excited. That dealer may have lost a few bucks on the card but he almost certainly made hobbyists out of that young family.
Darryl has come up to do Kyle's Frisco shows the last couple of months and he is a good guy -- and what Tri Star does is good for their business. Thankfully there is room for both types of promoters in the hobby. I could go into a long-winded version of why Dallas is not as good for Autograph shows as Houston, but that's better done on a long-form email or on a phone call.

Rich
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Last edited by Rich Klein; 07-21-2018 at 07:51 PM.
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