NonSports Forum

Net54baseball.com
Welcome to Net54baseball.com. These forums are devoted to both Pre- and Post- war baseball cards and vintage memorabilia, as well as other sports. There is a separate section for Buying, Selling and Trading - the B/S/T area!! If you give an opinion of a person or company your full name needs to be in your post. Contact the moderator at leon@net54baseball.com should you have any questions or concerns. Enjoy!
Net54baseball.com
Net54baseball.com

Go Back   Net54baseball.com Forums > Net54baseball Main PreWWII Forums > Net54baseball Sports (Primarily) Vintage Memorabilia Forum incl. Game Used

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 03-18-2017, 03:53 PM
JoeyFarino JoeyFarino is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 793
Default Telephone number history

Does anyone know what period they used 5 digit telephone numbers like this one

Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 03-18-2017, 04:10 PM
David Atkatz's Avatar
David Atkatz David Atkatz is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New York, NY
Posts: 2,577
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeyFarino View Post
Does anyone know what period they used 5 digit telephone numbers like this one

That is not a "five digit" phone number. Telephone exchanges used to have names. One such name was Murrey Hill. The phone number is MH 6-8826--you would dial 646 8826.

Youngster.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 03-18-2017, 04:12 PM
JoeyFarino JoeyFarino is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 793
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by David Atkatz View Post
That is not a "five digit" phone number. Telephone exchanges used to have names. One such name was Murrey Hill. The phone number is MH 6-8826--you would dial 646 8826.

Youngster.
Thanks for schoolin me...now I just need to pinpoint the era of this stamp
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 03-18-2017, 06:15 PM
ooo-ribay's Avatar
ooo-ribay ooo-ribay is offline
Rob
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Salt Lake
Posts: 1,597
Default

I loved those old names.

Ours was TUxedo 5-1505. 50 years later, it still rolls off my tongue.
__________________
if you can help with SF Giants items (no cards), let me send you my wantlist!
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 03-18-2017, 06:18 PM
steve B steve B is online now
Steve Birmingham
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: eastern Mass.
Posts: 4,039
Default

I looked it up once, and from what I recall the change to all numbers over the exchange being named varied from place to place, I'd think NY was fairly early in the change while small towns were probably last. (I grew up in a town that still had at least one crank phone and a switchboard while I lived there, and I'm not that old. ) And since the number dialed didn't really change a business might not have changed anything for a few years.

Steve B
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 03-18-2017, 06:49 PM
David Atkatz's Avatar
David Atkatz David Atkatz is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New York, NY
Posts: 2,577
Default

Phone numbers became standardized at seven figures (letters or numbers) in 1931. Some cities had two-letter/four digit dialing before that, and some had three-letter/four digit dialing. A standard system of two-letter/five digit dialing was phased in thru the 1930s. The letters in all cases were the first letters of an exchange name -- MUrray Hill, SPring, COlumbus, UNiversity, INgersoll, TRiangle, HUBbard, COPley, KIRkland, etc. etc. etc.

The changeover to all-number dialing was very gradual, beginning in 1958 and continuing into the 1970s. The transition was smoothest in small towns, where there were generally only one or two local exchanges, and most difficult in large cities where there were many neighborhood exchanges and often emotional attachment to the exchange names. New York City held out the longest, with some of the old exchange names in use as late as 1978.

However, your photo's stamp is pre-Zip Code. And there is no postal zone number present either. (In NYC, postal zone numbers were incorporated into Zip Codes. I grew up in Bronx, 53, NY, which became Bronx, NY 10453.) The United States Post Office Department implemented postal zones for numerous large cities in 1943. So the stamp is pre-1943, even though the photo event was 1946. Still using an old stamp.

Last edited by David Atkatz; 03-18-2017 at 06:51 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 03-18-2017, 08:13 PM
ooo-ribay's Avatar
ooo-ribay ooo-ribay is offline
Rob
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Salt Lake
Posts: 1,597
Default

I remember using this site, years ago, while reseaching something collection related:

http://ourwebhome.com/TENP/TENproject.html
__________________
if you can help with SF Giants items (no cards), let me send you my wantlist!
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 03-18-2017, 10:56 PM
bigfanNY bigfanNY is offline
Jonathan Sterling
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: NJ
Posts: 454
Default

I live in house my parents originally bought in 1962 and have a rotary dial phone on the wall which still has 2 letter exchange. I still like dialing a number from time to time..
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 03-20-2017, 09:24 PM
steve B steve B is online now
Steve Birmingham
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: eastern Mass.
Posts: 4,039
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by David Atkatz View Post
Phone numbers became standardized at seven figures (letters or numbers) in 1931. Some cities had two-letter/four digit dialing before that, and some had three-letter/four digit dialing. A standard system of two-letter/five digit dialing was phased in thru the 1930s. The letters in all cases were the first letters of an exchange name -- MUrray Hill, SPring, COlumbus, UNiversity, INgersoll, TRiangle, HUBbard, COPley, KIRkland, etc. etc. etc.

The changeover to all-number dialing was very gradual, beginning in 1958 and continuing into the 1970s. The transition was smoothest in small towns, where there were generally only one or two local exchanges, and most difficult in large cities where there were many neighborhood exchanges and often emotional attachment to the exchange names. New York City held out the longest, with some of the old exchange names in use as late as 1978.

However, your photo's stamp is pre-Zip Code. And there is no postal zone number present either. (In NYC, postal zone numbers were incorporated into Zip Codes. I grew up in Bronx, 53, NY, which became Bronx, NY 10453.) The United States Post Office Department implemented postal zones for numerous large cities in 1943. So the stamp is pre-1943, even though the photo event was 1946. Still using an old stamp.
Darn memory. Recalled it wrong between small towns and NYC.
I blame the fact that I grew up in a town with a non- Bell company phone system.

Steve B
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 03-22-2017, 12:03 PM
prewarsports prewarsports is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,187
Default

David

That was a really informative answer that I enjoyed reading. Thanks for the detailed information! What are all these millennials going to do when you cant look up life experience on the internet?
__________________
Be sure to check out my site www.RMYAuctions.com
Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
1911 Heroes of History/Men of History (T68) Archive Net54baseball Vintage (Pre-WWII) Baseball Cards & New Member Introductions 4 10-23-2004 04:13 PM
telephone auction Archive Net54baseball Vintage (Pre-WWII) Baseball Cards & New Member Introductions 0 09-20-2004 11:17 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:28 PM.


ebay GSB