NonSports Forum

Net54baseball.com
Welcome to Net54baseball.com. These forums are devoted to both Pre- and Post- war baseball cards and vintage memorabilia, as well as other sports. There is a separate section for Buying, Selling and Trading - the B/S/T area!! If you give an opinion of a person or company your full name needs to be in your post. Contact the moderator at leon@net54baseball.com should you have any questions or concerns. Enjoy!
Net54baseball.com
Net54baseball.com

Go Back   Net54baseball.com Forums > Net54baseball Postwar Sportscard Forums > Postwar Baseball Cards Forum (Pre-1980)

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #41  
Old 09-14-2018, 05:19 PM
nolemmings's Avatar
nolemmings nolemmings is offline
Todd Schultz
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Phoenix
Posts: 2,556
Default somebody stop me

The more I think about it, the more I believe that the traded set had been configured by mid-December. Topps decided upon a 44 card set, which is one sheet with the cards printed thrice. There’s no way they can count on there being that many total trades in December/January–recent past history strongly suggested otherwise–much less trades of meaningful players worthy of their own cards. Thus they already had to know that almost if not all of the trades were in the bank before going forward. As it turns out, 39 of the 43 players in the traded set switched teams between December 3 and December 11, with the others having done so earlier.

By December 12, then, Topps probably had its traded set composition, and it was just a matter of airbrushing selected photos and drafting some brief text for the card backs. If they tried to acknowledge a change in the regular set, there would a hole to fill to get back to 43 Traded (plus checklist), and they would have to count on subsequent player movement, little of which really happened (the only trades involving players on a regular 1974 card made between 12/11/73 and 2/1/74 were for Jack Aker, Mike Ryan and Jackie Hernandez, the latter two being swapped on the last day of January).

Sooooooooooooooo, instead of having planned all along to have a traded set, it seems to me Topps was so overwhelmed with player movement in that first week plus of December that they knew they couldn’t make all necessary changes before print time and decided to issue a traded set because they knew they would have 43 players to fill it. Rather than changing a couple or so of these in the regular set and then wait for the January trades, they finalized their selection well before year end, and printed the Traded set then or shortly thereafter.
__________________
No sooner had I hit the streets
When I met the fools that a young fool meets
All in search of truth and bound for glory
And listening to our own heartbeats
We stood around the drum
Though it's fainter now, the older I've become
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 09-15-2018, 09:56 PM
steve B steve B is offline
Steve Birmingham
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: eastern Mass.
Posts: 5,018
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by nolemmings View Post
Thanks Steve. It still seems kind of baffling to me that they couldn't wait 2-3 weeks and see if the Washington thing was really likely to happen, given the lawsuits and conditions that needed to be met.

Has anyone seen a proof of sheet #5? I ask because Denny Doyle, who had been traded December 6, is shown with his new Angels team in the regular set, while Jim Mason, traded the same day, is not, and both are included in the higher numbers (#552 and #618) and Mason is shown with his new Yankee squad on the traded set. The Doyle card is a nondescript shot of him with some minor sort of airbrush job, almost certainly swapped out late from a better photo. I wonder if the proof sheet would show a different pic of Doyle. Also seems they could have corrected Mason in the regular set but chose otherwise. Since all of their "trades" were completed just 5 days after December 6, 1973, it makes you wonder why they couldn't wait another week, although maybe the plan all along was to have a traded set and they needed to fill it with players.

I wouldn't be surprised to see proofs of Doyle both ways.


The one I've always wondered about was one I heard as a kid rumor in 74, which was the first set I really collected, aside from a bit in late 73.

Supposedly there was confusion about who would be the As manager, so the card had a question mark instead of a picture of a manager.

Al Dark was signed on Feb 20, so that shouldn't have been a problem. But there'd been some legal wrangling about Dick Williams being under contract so he couldn't manage the Yankees. (Why that wouldn't have affected the Yankees manager card the same way I have no idea, it was a 5th grade rumor. ) So maybe it's plausible?
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 09-15-2018, 10:00 PM
steve B steve B is offline
Steve Birmingham
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: eastern Mass.
Posts: 5,018
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by nolemmings View Post
The more I think about it, the more I believe that the traded set had been configured by mid-December. Topps decided upon a 44 card set, which is one sheet with the cards printed thrice. There’s no way they can count on there being that many total trades in December/January–recent past history strongly suggested otherwise–much less trades of meaningful players worthy of their own cards. Thus they already had to know that almost if not all of the trades were in the bank before going forward. As it turns out, 39 of the 43 players in the traded set switched teams between December 3 and December 11, with the others having done so earlier.

By December 12, then, Topps probably had its traded set composition, and it was just a matter of airbrushing selected photos and drafting some brief text for the card backs. If they tried to acknowledge a change in the regular set, there would a hole to fill to get back to 43 Traded (plus checklist), and they would have to count on subsequent player movement, little of which really happened (the only trades involving players on a regular 1974 card made between 12/11/73 and 2/1/74 were for Jack Aker, Mike Ryan and Jackie Hernandez, the latter two being swapped on the last day of January).

Sooooooooooooooo, instead of having planned all along to have a traded set, it seems to me Topps was so overwhelmed with player movement in that first week plus of December that they knew they couldn’t make all necessary changes before print time and decided to issue a traded set because they knew they would have 43 players to fill it. Rather than changing a couple or so of these in the regular set and then wait for the January trades, they finalized their selection well before year end, and printed the Traded set then or shortly thereafter.

That's pretty interesting.


The actual press sheets are 264 cards, So there would have been an "extra" sheet to use for the traded set, or the team checklists. I wonder..... amaybe they replaced one of the sheets with Washington players with the traded set, at least for a while.


Ah Topps, such simple sets with so much mystery.
Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Topps Factory Set Experts - In late 80's & early 90's did Topps seal w/ plain tape? frankhardy Modern Baseball Cards Forum (1980-Present) 6 08-31-2018 09:21 AM
FYI....T206 PIEDMONT factory 25 & factory 42 confirmed lists tedzan Net54baseball Vintage (WWII & Older) Baseball Cards & New Member Introductions 27 04-11-2016 10:50 AM
1912 T207 Recruit factory 240 amd factory 606 cards kmac32 Net54baseball Vintage (WWII & Older) Baseball Cards & New Member Introductions 15 12-16-2015 10:53 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:30 PM.


ebay GSB