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  #1  
Old 06-02-2016, 08:47 AM
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ksabet ksabet is offline
K!ya S@bet
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Default Anyone else treasure a worthless card?

I found mine in a shoebox just yesterday. My parents moved us from Buffalo to Miami. My mom and siblings went ahead, but I drove down in the U-Haul with my dad. I was 7 years old and mustve had 30 cans of Mountain Dew on the way down before years later my parents realized just what poison they fed their son. Spending two days with your old man in a moving truck is a treasure in itself for a young kid.

Anyways they bought me a half dozen 1983 Topps Rack packs to open on the way down. First pack first card was Paul Boris. Not sure why this card has stayed with me for over 30 years while every other card has come and gone but its still here.

True story...the card behind Paul Boris? Tony Gwynn but who cared. I had Paul Boris!
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  #2  
Old 06-02-2016, 09:32 AM
Republicaninmass Republicaninmass is offline
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The year was 1989, I was a 13 year old heading to Fenway park with my 53 year old grandmother (now 90!) for her first Red Sox game against the Mighty Oakland A's. A late September battle on a Sunday afternoon, to which I had been looking forward to all summer long. I had spent countless hours thinking about this day, just my second Red Sox game, and my Grandmother, a die hard fan, having her first visit to Fenway. I can't tell whether it meant more to me then or now, but the feeling is still overwhelming.

In preparation, I had thumbed through countless baseball cards, in an attempt to find cards of players to ask for autographs during batting practice at the dugout. Of course my parents, and grandmother thought I was dreaming of actually getting someone to sign one of my cards, but I had heard, probably through Beckett magazine at the time, that players would willingly sign their cards!

Herein lies the problem, the Red Sox latest star, Nick Esasky did not have a Red Sox card yet. On a "tear" with 26 home runs, probably leading the team at that point, I needed to hunt for a card of his. Mind you the bash brothers, Canseco and McGwire only had HR numbers in the mid 20s as well. I could not show up empty handed in case the once in a lifetime chance occured that he decided to sign my card. I finally found one in my stash, a 1989 Score card of him on the Reds. Now I was ready for the game!

I entered Fenway with wide eyes, only a child could have. When I walked up that ramp and saw the green monster, and the outfield grass, after watching it on tv38 so many times, it took my breath away. The sheer size, color, and smells of the park sent me into sensory overload. I had my plastic freezer bag filled with cards, and a pen of course, and headed down to the mob scene which was looking for autographs around the red sox dugout.

After trying and failing with many of the players, some of who signed, and some who didn't sign, along came Nicky. I started yelling "Mr Esasky, Mr Esasky" thumbing madly through my cards looking for his 1989 Score card. I don't know if it was the lack of having a red sox card that helped my efforts that day, because it seemed like I was the only one yelling his name. Our eyes locked, and sure enough he came over and granted a 13 year old boy his wish.

When I got back to my seats I was wild! My parents and Grandmother couldn't believe I actually got a card signed, be it of the "superstar" that was Nick Esasky. The only thing that could have made it better, was if he hit a home run after touching my card for luck. He did in the 7th inning, and I probably pee'd a little.

Thanks for the thread, I enjoy reliving the moment any time I look at the card

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  #3  
Old 06-02-2016, 01:27 PM
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Rick McQuillan
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When I got back into collecting back in the mid 90's, my wife and I were at a card shop in Middleton WI. My wife bought me a VG/EX Robin Yount rookie, which, at $25, was the most expensive card that I owned at the time. I still have that card, and it has always been one of my favorite cards.

Rick
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  #4  
Old 06-02-2016, 02:34 PM
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7nohitter 7nohitter is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Republicaninmass View Post
The year was 1989, I was a 13 year old heading to Fenway park with my 53 year old grandmother (now 90!) for her first Red Sox game against the Mighty Oakland A's. A late September battle on a Sunday afternoon, to which I had been looking forward to all summer long. I had spent countless hours thinking about this day, just my second Red Sox game, and my Grandmother, a die hard fan, having her first visit to Fenway. I can't tell whether it meant more to me then or now, but the feeling is still overwhelming.

In preparation, I had thumbed through countless baseball cards, in an attempt to find cards of players to ask for autographs during batting practice at the dugout. Of course my parents, and grandmother thought I was dreaming of actually getting someone to sign one of my cards, but I had heard, probably through Beckett magazine at the time, that players would willingly sign their cards!

Herein lies the problem, the Red Sox latest star, Nick Esasky did not have a Red Sox card yet. On a "tear" with 26 home runs, probably leading the team at that point, I needed to hunt for a card of his. Mind you the bash brothers, Canseco and McGwire only had HR numbers in the mid 20s as well. I could not show up empty handed in case the once in a lifetime chance occured that he decided to sign my card. I finally found one in my stash, a 1989 Score card of him on the Reds. Now I was ready for the game!

I entered Fenway with wide eyes, only a child could have. When I walked up that ramp and saw the green monster, and the outfield grass, after watching it on tv38 so many times, it took my breath away. The sheer size, color, and smells of the park sent me into sensory overload. I had my plastic freezer bag filled with cards, and a pen of course, and headed down to the mob scene which was looking for autographs around the red sox dugout.

After trying and failing with many of the players, some of who signed, and some who didn't sign, along came Nicky. I started yelling "Mr Esasky, Mr Esasky" thumbing madly through my cards looking for his 1989 Score card. I don't know if it was the lack of having a red sox card that helped my efforts that day, because it seemed like I was the only one yelling his name. Our eyes locked, and sure enough he came over and granted a 13 year old boy his wish.

When I got back to my seats I was wild! My parents and Grandmother couldn't believe I actually got a card signed, be it of the "superstar" that was Nick Esasky. The only thing that could have made it better, was if he hit a home run after touching my card for luck. He did in the 7th inning, and I probably pee'd a little.

Thanks for the thread, I enjoy reliving the moment any time I look at the card

Ted,
I can completely identify with you recollection. We are the same age. Growing up in Framingham, I was lucky to go to several Sox games a year. I always got there for 5:30, right when the gates open. IO made a beeline for the visitor's dugout and from 1990-1993 I always got at least one autograph. Cecile Fielder, Dave Winfield, Matt Merullo, Wade Boggs just to name a few. Always a fun time.
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  #5  
Old 06-02-2016, 04:02 PM
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almostdone almostdone is offline
Drew Ekb@ck
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About 1999 or 2000 my mother really wanted to give me a card because she knew how much I loved to collect. She did her own research a gave me a card for Christmas she thought would be great. At the time it was very hot. A 1990 Leaf Sammy Sosa rookie card. I was floored. I couldn't believe she did that much work to find a card of that value at the time.

Of course within a few year Sosa went from a hero to a suspected PED user and bat corker. His cards, like his popularity, plummeted.

I never had the heart to tell my mom as she was so proud she had gotten it for me.

My mom passed away 8 years ago this month never knowing the cards eventual fate. I still proudly display it in my collection though as a reminder of a mothers love of her son and his passion that she knew nothing about.

Drew
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Last edited by almostdone; 06-02-2016 at 04:04 PM.
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  #6  
Old 06-02-2016, 06:11 PM
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Duluth Eskimo Duluth Eskimo is offline
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The first card I ever purchased and did not get out of a pack was a 1973 Topps All Time Home Run Leaders card with Ruth, Aaron, and Mays. I thought it was the greatest thing ever, Babe Ruth. After collecting for many years I still have that card which was maybe Ex when I bought (AKA: Mint then) it and G-Vg at best now. I can still remember how excited I was to get that card
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  #7  
Old 06-02-2016, 07:14 PM
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jerseygary jerseygary is offline
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When I was moving from Hollywood to Kentucky 4 years ago I discovered at the bottom of an old box an unopened wax pack of 1988 Topps.

It was in an envelope mailed to me when I was away at college in '88. Back then my Dad would from time to time mail me a pack of cards he'd pick up in the candy store he'd stop at every morning for coffee back in Passaic, NJ. We both loved baseball and its history and when I'd get a pack out of the blue once or twice a year it always reminded me of that common ground we were fortunate to share.

He passed away suddenly right before the '09 World Series. I have no clue how I overlooked opening this pack back in '88, and I know it aint worth nothing, but it will forever remind me of my Dad.
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  #8  
Old 06-02-2016, 07:54 PM
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Chris Counts Chris Counts is offline
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I've kept a really beat-up '48 Bowman Pete Reiser longer than any card I own. While he wasn't exactly the luckiest player who ever lived — her career was derailed by multiple collisions with outfield walls — i was impressed by his story and talent. I now keep the card around as a good luck charm.
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  #9  
Old 06-02-2016, 08:29 PM
mikemb mikemb is offline
Mike Lenart
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ksabet View Post
I found mine in a shoebox just yesterday. My parents moved us from Buffalo to Miami. My mom and siblings went ahead, but I drove down in the U-Haul with my dad. I was 7 years old and mustve had 30 cans of Mountain Dew on the way down before years later my parents realized just what poison they fed their son. Spending two days with your old man in a moving truck is a treasure in itself for a young kid.

Anyways they bought me a half dozen 1983 Topps Rack packs to open on the way down. First pack first card was Paul Boris. Not sure why this card has stayed with me for over 30 years while every other card has come and gone but its still here.

True story...the card behind Paul Boris? Tony Gwynn but who cared. I had Paul Boris!
I went to college with Paul at Rutgers. He was a friend of my brother and they were 2 years ahead of me. Had lunch with him there numerous times and followed his path up the ladder in the Yankees farm system and then the trade to the Twins and his eventual trip to the majors.
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  #10  
Old 06-02-2016, 09:31 PM
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ksabet ksabet is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by almostdone View Post
About 1999 or 2000 my mother really wanted to give me a card because she knew how much I loved to collect. She did her own research a gave me a card for Christmas she thought would be great. At the time it was very hot. A 1990 Leaf Sammy Sosa rookie card. I was floored. I couldn't believe she did that much work to find a card of that value at the time.

Of course within a few year Sosa went from a hero to a suspected PED user and bat corker. His cards, like his popularity, plummeted.

I never had the heart to tell my mom as she was so proud she had gotten it for me.

My mom passed away 8 years ago this month never knowing the cards eventual fate. I still proudly display it in my collection though as a reminder of a mothers love of her son and his passion that she knew nothing about.

Drew
Mic drop!!

What a heartfelt mom story...moms are amazing
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  #11  
Old 06-02-2016, 09:32 PM
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ksabet ksabet is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jerseygary View Post
When I was moving from Hollywood to Kentucky 4 years ago I discovered at the bottom of an old box an unopened wax pack of 1988 Topps.

It was in an envelope mailed to me when I was away at college in '88. Back then my Dad would from time to time mail me a pack of cards he'd pick up in the candy store he'd stop at every morning for coffee back in Passaic, NJ. We both loved baseball and its history and when I'd get a pack out of the blue once or twice a year it always reminded me of that common ground we were fortunate to share.

He passed away suddenly right before the '09 World Series. I have no clue how I overlooked opening this pack back in '88, and I know it aint worth nothing, but it will forever remind me of my Dad.

Your dad sounded like a good guy...nice story
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  #12  
Old 06-02-2016, 09:33 PM
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ksabet ksabet is offline
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Originally Posted by mikemb View Post
I went to college with Paul at Rutgers. He was a friend of my brother and they were 2 years ahead of me. Had lunch with him there numerous times and followed his path up the ladder in the Yankees farm system and then the trade to the Twins and his eventual trip to the majors.
Wow that is amazing...do you know what became of him?

Can you get my card signed lol
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  #13  
Old 06-02-2016, 09:45 PM
dclarkraiders dclarkraiders is offline
Duane Clark
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Originally Posted by ksabet View Post
Mic drop!!

What a heartfelt mom story...moms are amazing
+1
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  #14  
Old 06-02-2016, 09:46 PM
mikemb mikemb is offline
Mike Lenart
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Originally Posted by ksabet View Post
Wow that is amazing...do you know what became of him?

Can you get my card signed lol
I lost touch with him many years ago, but, he did sign my 1983 Topps card as well as some of his minor league cards.

Last edited by mikemb; 06-03-2016 at 06:20 AM.
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  #15  
Old 06-02-2016, 09:56 PM
dclarkraiders dclarkraiders is offline
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Not a worthless card but my Father purchased a 1965 Topps Koufax at a card show he and I attended probably 20 years ago. My Father was a big Dodgers fan. He passed away in Dec 2001 and months later when my Mother found this card she called me to inquire whether I wanted it. Of course, I said yes. Below is the card. I have contemplated getting it graded but I have decided that it is best left unslabbed just as it was when my Father purchased it. It helps remind me of him and many good times we had.

Duane
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  #16  
Old 06-04-2016, 08:24 PM
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Originally Posted by dclarkraiders View Post
Not a worthless card but my Father purchased a 1965 Topps Koufax at a card show he and I attended probably 20 years ago. My Father was a big Dodgers fan. He passed away in Dec 2001 and months later when my Mother found this card she called me to inquire whether I wanted it. Of course, I said yes. Below is the card. I have contemplated getting it graded but I have decided that it is best left unslabbed just as it was when my Father purchased it. It helps remind me of him and many good times we had.

Duane
Another nice pops story...thanks for sharing
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  #17  
Old 06-04-2016, 08:54 PM
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Gorgeous Koufax enjoy
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  #18  
Old 06-04-2016, 10:12 PM
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And.rew Whi.te
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I have six cards that have no value but hold sentimental value to me. These are the six cards left over from my childhood collection that have actual writing on them from a ten year old me!

I have had hundreds of thousands of cards in my collection over the last 40+ years and I still have no idea how in the world I hung onto these but I am sure glad I did.

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