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  #1  
Old 10-05-2020, 07:32 AM
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CarltonHendricks CarltonHendricks is offline
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Default Carlton World





http://sportsantiques.com/viennabbbronze.htm
Twenty two years ago I saw one of these Vienna baseball bronzes that you can read about in the feature linked above. I couldn’t afford that one and I had been on the lookout for another ever since. Recently a collector I’ve known a while who only collects University of Pennsylvania items wanted three things from my collection and I traded them for this Vienna. I gave up my Leyendecker U. Penn football poster, a big porcelain U. Penn football lamp (the collector had a matching lamp so now he has a pair), and a 12” plaster figure of a U. Penn football player (which I most hated to give up of the three)…I gave it a lot of thought since it’s so worn. I consulted two collector friends who gave the thumbs up.

On the one hand yes it’s worn and beat up…but on the other hand…you’re 300% sure it’s original from the wear. And speaking of the wear…it would have to be the most mysterious statue I’ve ever dealt with. Reason being…how could it have gotten that worn…And the arm is cracked…hey It’s bronze...I don’t think I’ve ever heard of bronze cracking…and besides that how could it have gotten cracked downward the way it is…Bronze is extremely strong stuff…And then there’s the base…How in the world could the paint have gotten that much wear and yet the red marble base is essentially perfect!....puzzling and a mystery. To me it looks like it has been clanging around in a toy box full of toys for about three generations...Like there parents let them play with it as a toy...Another thing I'll mention is the catchers mask is missing. You'll see the featured one has the mask...They were so finely crafted you could remove them!

But being I already had three other Vienna sports bronzes it fit in perfectly with them…a billiards one…two joined boxers…and a group of three soccer players going for the ball…I found that soccer one at the Hillsborough Antiques show about 20 years ago and had to throw down some very serious money to get it…The lady was an experienced antiques dealer from the east coast and knew what she had!…Out of the zillions of Vienna bronzes produced during the late 19th century to the late 1930’s very few sports ones were made.

In all the years I’ve known of the one I did the feature on…I never stopped to think about the P on the batters cap…And there’s an H on the catchers, (cap worn backwards). I understand that under the bronze base of mine, the words “Harvard and Pennsylvania” is written. I hate to disturb it though so haven’t looked. To add more to the mystery...Because the other one I featured also had the same P on the cap...I would speculate that perhaps some well heeled parent of a Harvard or Penn student had them made special order...

Auction House Description:
Exceedingly scarce antique cast metal baseball player statue titled "Two Strikes" showing a batter and a catcher. Circa 1890s. Much of the original paint remains, including the letter P on the batter and the letter H on the catcher. When metal statue was removed from base the words "Harvard and Pennsylvania" were found written under the metal baseplate, indicating that the players depict a game between University of Pennsylvania Quakers and Harvard Crimson, both Ivy League schools. Good condition with original base plaque and minor damage to the bat. Measures 6 1/2" tall.


Another interesting tid-bit is one day I was thumbing thru a book on Victorian Interiors...and guess what I spotted in a c1905 photo...see at very bottom this post...























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Last edited by CarltonHendricks; 10-30-2020 at 01:52 AM.
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  #2  
Old 10-05-2020, 08:09 AM
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Carlton,
As we know we are only care takers of these items and we are all getting older! At this point in life if it makes you happy (and I know it does) you have to go for it! Its a cool piece and it fits right into your collection! Looks like it made you happy and made your friend happy.. SOOOOO a nice win win! Enjoy it and as always great collection!
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Old 10-05-2020, 08:16 AM
Bill Rayburn Bill Rayburn is offline
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WOW!!! Great piece, even though a lot of paint is missing the detail is fantastic. I especially like the "ring bat" the U Penn player is holding.
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  #4  
Old 10-05-2020, 08:28 AM
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anytime you can trade football for baseball I would do it. Great piece!
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  #5  
Old 10-05-2020, 08:45 AM
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Great piece. Love you got in trade also, the very best deal as both sides get something they wanted more.
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  #6  
Old 10-05-2020, 09:40 AM
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Beautiful piece, Carlton.
Congrats on finally being able to add it to your great collection!
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  #7  
Old 10-05-2020, 09:42 AM
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terrific do you still have the mustang??
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Old 10-07-2020, 09:11 PM
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Congrats on your deal! I sure do love those football pieces you traded!
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  #9  
Old 10-07-2020, 10:25 PM
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Your spotting the piece in the photograph is almost as impressive as finding the piece itself! Fabulous
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  #10  
Old 10-09-2020, 05:35 AM
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Default Rare Motorcycle Statue

Hey thanks everyone for the kind words on the Vienna...Below another recent p/u...



Picked this up in an auction in Belgium recently…friend tipped me off to it…I prefer American but this was too cool to pass up…These city to city races were popular with motorcycles and autos in the teens and twenties in Western Europe…I gather this Liege to Paris to Liege race was a major race…but I’ve had a hard time researching it because I don’t know the go to people in Europe and the language barrier….the three major languages spoken in Belgium are Dutch, French, and German…Liege was I think the second largest city in Belgium next to Brussels…ya learn a lot collecting!…I think most Americans find this all curious but from what I’ve seen motorcycle racing was no less popular in Europe than it was here…maybe more so…Italy, Germany, France….they were all motorcycle crazy back in the early days of the teens and twenties…Below are some key questions I would like to learn about this statue.

1. Was it a trophy?
2. Was it a souvenir?
3. Who made it?
4. How many were made?
5. Were similar statues made for other races?
6. How many contestants competed in the race?
7. Who won the race?






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Old 10-09-2020, 03:58 PM
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Default Rare Motorcycle Statue

Hey Carlton,
Great pickup! Please circle back when you answer the 7 questions! Fabulous images of the statue! Did you use some type of special photographers box? The statue is in great shape for being so fragile!
I imagine it is pretty light because it’s plaster? Thanks for sharing!
John
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Old 10-09-2020, 06:09 PM
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If you do your search through Chrome or Chrome Edge you may have the option to translate automatically. It does it for me when I search ebay Germany. It also did it when I found your statue on the site that sold it. You got it for a fair price.

Here is a link to the oldest cycle/motorcyle manufacturer in Belgium. If you read the article you will see that they entered 3 bikes in the 1921 race with factory drivers and won 3 gold medals. Making motorcycles since 1901.
https://www.sarolea.com/story

Check out their current models. Wild looking bikes - N60 and MANX7.
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Last edited by Michael B; 10-09-2020 at 06:20 PM.
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  #13  
Old 10-10-2020, 06:26 AM
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Default Interesting little gadget

Thanks John...will do on those answers but not so easy...

Below a cool little piece...










This was an interesting little eBay snag I got last week, that came yesterday…Cruising eBay at my usual speed…something flashed by that caught my eye…put in reverse…found and clicked on it…the heck is this chingadera I thought…anything with Victorian lithography like that want to know more…turned out it was an exercise invention for home use…and American!…bingo…it was sitting at $1.00 I think it was with one bid and a few days to go…I wanted it for $20 or so but it was pretty cool so I put a “just in case” snipe of $38.88…So what happened?...some wack job like me went and bid $37.00…can you believe that!!...but once I opened it no problem…I found a great story on Whitely on Stack.com…below an excerpt…click the link above it for the full story…

https://www.stack.com/a/1800s-home-gym-trx
EXCERPT
In the mid-1800's, strength training and fitness began to emerge both in business and popular culture in America.

By the late 1880s, Dudley Sargent, an assistant professor of physical education at Harvard University, had designed several free-standing pulley machines to exercise the back, chest and abdominal muscles. These machines relied primarily on weight stacks, making the resistance level adjustable. But the machines were large and didn't gain wide use beyond Harvard's gym.

In 1894, Alexander Whitely unveiled a pulley-driven exercise machine for the masses. With just a single pulley that could be attached to a wall or doorframe, it was suitable for in-home use. By changing the position of the pulley, the Whitely Exerciser allowed users to perform a full-body workout—one that purportedly could be completed in less than an hour.

Since the device was portable, the Whitely was marketed to business folks and travelers, and to those subjected to stress or "nervous energy." It was also aimed at women, proclaiming itself capable of "making weak women strong" and suitable "for every member of the family," young and old. - Maddy Lucier
END EXCERPT












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Last edited by CarltonHendricks; 10-11-2020 at 05:46 AM.
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Old 10-11-2020, 08:38 AM
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Default Exerciser Pulley

Great pickup! Very Victorian in appearance. I have a similar system to rehab my shoulder. The thing is it generates so much heat as the rope moves through the gear quickly and the pulley itself bangs up against the door.
My theory why yours is in such great shape is because when your athlete started using it to muscle up in the house and his wife saw what it was doing to her doors she got pissed and that practice stopped right away. Lol! 😃😂🤣🤪
I also think the heat that those little pulley’s generate would have deteriorated the finish/look in a few uses. Anyone that has ever rehabbed a shoulder could probably vouch for what I am saying. My wonderful, loving wife makes me go down in the basement and use a door that nobody sees to use the pull system to loosen up my shoulder.
Great addition to your collection C!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by CarltonHendricks View Post
Thanks John...will do on those answers but not so easy...

Below a cool little piece...










This was an interesting little eBay snag I got last week, that came yesterday…Cruising eBay at my usual speed…something flashed by that caught my eye…put in reverse…found and clicked on it…the heck is this chingadera I thought…anything with Victorian lithography like that want to know more…turned out it was an exercise invention for home use…and American!…bingo…it was sitting at $1.00 I think it was with one bid and a few days to go…I wanted it for $20 or so but it was pretty cool so I put a “just in case” snipe of $38.88…So what happened?...some wack job like me went and bid $37.00…can you believe that!!...but once I opened it no problem…I found a great story on Whitely on Stack.com…below an excerpt…click the link above it for the full story…

https://www.stack.com/a/1800s-home-gym-trx
EXCERPT
In the mid-1800's, strength training and fitness began to emerge both in business and popular culture in America.

By the late 1880s, Dudley Sargent, an assistant professor of physical education at Harvard University, had designed several free-standing pulley machines to exercise the back, chest and abdominal muscles. These machines relied primarily on weight stacks, making the resistance level adjustable. But the machines were large and didn't gain wide use beyond Harvard's gym.

In 1894, Alexander Whitely unveiled a pulley-driven exercise machine for the masses. With just a single pulley that could be attached to a wall or doorframe, it was suitable for in-home use. By changing the position of the pulley, the Whitely Exerciser allowed users to perform a full-body workout—one that purportedly could be completed in less than an hour.

Since the device was portable, the Whitely was marketed to business folks and travelers, and to those subjected to stress or "nervous energy." It was also aimed at women, proclaiming itself capable of "making weak women strong" and suitable "for every member of the family," young and old. - Maddy Lucier
END EXCERPT












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  #15  
Old 10-20-2020, 05:15 AM
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Default Boat Trophy





Foremost I’m into speed boats but I just couldn’t pass up this cabin cruiser trophy…I’m not sure if it was a one off custom made…or a stock one you could order from a catalog. The boat is certainly not cast but assembled which would require much more soldering, fabrication, and design skills…Since I’ve never seen another…I lean toward custom…Perhaps someone from this community would have it in a catalog. For me what really sets it apart are the perfect crisp details of the boat…born on horseshoe cradles…combined with that well defined ebony base…Plus the engraved shields…Occasionally you see engraved shields like those on American trophies…but mostly it’s an English thing…Initially I speculated Dieges and Clust might have made it since they were in NYC close to Staten Island where the presenting yacht club was…now that I have it in hand I’m also including John Frick Jewelers NYC…and Black, Starr & Frost, also in NYC as other contenders…If I removed the black wooden base I would probably find the maker stamped under the base of the upper brass part. But I hate disturbing a ninety eight year old piece like this…The mast looks bent but I’ll live with it for while till I figure something out.



In 1922 it was given as a contribution by the Princess Bay Yacht Club to the Raritan Bay Yacht Racing Association. The Raritan Bay Yacht Racing Association was an association of numerous yacht clubs from the Raritan Bay vicinity, which is located off the southern end of Staten Island and extends across the sound to New Jersey. From what I can gather it appears the Raritan Bay Yacht Racing association was formed for the purpose of organizing regattas and social functions between neighboring yacht clubs. Initially when it formed in 1922 the founding clubs were the Raritan Yacht Club, the Sewaren Yacht Club, the Rah-way Yacht Club, and the Princess Bay Yacht Club. Other clubs were anticipated to join as well.



One thing about yacht clubs is they exist for pleasure…it’s all about fun. I can imagine some of the shindigs they put on…4th of July BBQ’s…Christmas parties, etc…The one photo I found of the Princess Bay club, posted above, certainly looks like the kind of place members enjoyed with their families and friends. Previous to this trophy my research of yacht clubs was of ultra-exclusive ones like the New York Yacht Club and Eastern YC…Somehow I get the feeling these Raritan Bay clubs were made up of the middle class. From what I read their regattas were full on robust affairs that featured races for quite a number of classes of boats…speed boat, sail, cabin cruiser, and others…To me these modest clubs represent the opportunity and prosperity a God blessed America offered for the hard work of the fortunate.



As for this trophies lifespan…it appears to have been intended as a perpetual…since we see the three boats that won it… Why it stops after three years is certainly curious…Somehow it eventually migrated from Staten Island to Muncie Indiana where the seller is located without any damage besides the mast…Below our exchange once I got it…

Sent:Oct-16-20 12:55
got the trophy fine...Q where the heck did you find this thing???....please elaborate on everything you might know...come from antiques store?....flea market?...auction?...family heirloom?...I'm wild over it!!!!!
-carlton
SportsAntiques.com

Received:Oct-16-20 23:40
Carlton, Glad you like it. Not much to tell. I have a guy here local that calls me when he needs money. I know he bought from a local auction. You'll have to make up a good story on this one. Sorry,












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Last edited by CarltonHendricks; 10-20-2020 at 01:39 PM.
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Old 10-20-2020, 03:10 PM
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Great thread, Carlton! What amazes me most, besides your pickups, is the amount of info you are able to find on your acquisitions. Old ads, newspaper articles, etc. How do you find all the background information? You must be using more than just Google...
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Old 10-22-2020, 10:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ooo-ribay View Post
Great thread, Carlton! What amazes me most, besides your pickups, is the amount of info you are able to find on your acquisitions. Old ads, newspaper articles, etc. How do you find all the background information? You must be using more than just Google...

Thanks Rob…I have a subterranean research facility of four square blocks I access by elevator. Once down there I use a moped to get to the section I want…Just kidding…I have a fair amount of reference material I’ve collected over thirty plus years…but mostly I use the internet….

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Old 10-23-2020, 05:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CarltonHendricks View Post

Thanks Rob…I have a subterranean research facility of four square blocks I access by elevator. Once down there I use a moped to get to the section I want…Just kidding…I have a fair amount of reference material I’ve collected over thirty plus years…but mostly I use the internet….

You had me going, until I got to the moped. I thought you were gonna say you worked for the intelligence community.
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Old 10-26-2020, 04:19 AM
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Default Boat Sign



A month ago I went out antiquing on a Sunday afternoon…last store of the day I saw this 12 foot boat sales sign…great folk art but where was I gonna put it...It was so cool I hated to not get it…the worn blue lettering had me…But I had to think hard where I could hang it…the store was closing so I told them I’d have to give some thought and the dealer gave me his best price to ponder…After racking my brain I thought of a spot that might work…got home and measured, just barely fit but I could make it work…I called the store the next day and they delivered it for $50.00...It's from the San Francisco Bay Area...too bad it's not inscribed on the back "New London Boat Sales, Purveyor to Yale Crew Team"....has that look...

So we set up a delivery time…and I started thinking…I got non-sport antiques to move….he’s an antiques dealer…why not sell him some stuff…I had a great folk art bread sign with gold paint displayed in my kitchen for years…but I got a porcelain NYC Municipal Railway sign I wanted to put there…so it was time to move out the bread sign…He bought that and a locker room bench I got at Alameda but ended up not wanting…thank the Lord I paid for the boat sales sign plus got rid of stuff….win-win for everybody…Once I get organized I’ll get it hung…








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Old 10-26-2020, 07:48 AM
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Like you I also love the blue, but the rope outline makes it different. Very nice.
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Old 11-06-2020, 06:10 AM
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Default Wilton Gas Bash et al








Last Sunday I got up at 3:00AM and went to a gas bash in Wilton Ca about 1 ½ hour drive. Wilton is at the bottom of the foothills of the Gold Country…not all that far from Sacramento…got there right about the time the gate opened. Gas bashes are mostly petro related advertising but other advertising shows up. I didn’t find anything sports so just to prove I was there I got a little porcelain San Francisco Water Department no trespassing porcelain sign for my bathroom, for $35.00



Later that day I went to an antique mall in Roseville and got a great motorcycle photo of Miny Waln and Sprouts Elder side by side astride motorcycles… Miny Waln was National Speedway Champion in 1930, 1932 and 1933…Sprouts Elder also won the National Speedway championship in 1925… Waln’s grandson has a blog all about him http://minywaln.blogspot.com/ …I also got an American Motorcycle Association arm band. Down below is a bio of Waln…

After that find I continued around the store and spotted a very unusual tennis trophy…I thought was a trophy that is…It turned out to be a dinner gong missing the gong. I couldn’t resist it. I could tell it was English. During the Edwardian era 1900-1910 they produced a lot of silver plate decorative tennis nick-knacks such as this.


The Following biographical sketch of AMA Motorcycle Museum Hall of Famer Miny Waln is courtesy minywaln.blogspot.com
Minard H. Waln, known the length and breadth of the short track racing world as the "Mighty Mite,” was born in Cedar Rapids, Iowa November 20, 1901. Miny spent most of his school and boyhood days on the family country estate, taking long courses in the art of hunting, fishing, hiking and the like.

After finishing school, Waln began traveling and visited Richmond, Virginia during the war. His racing career began in 1918 at the age of 16 and in his first year racing he took the Iowa State Championship. "I rode a Pope at Cedar Rapids my first race" Miny said. "The favorite was a scrappy guy named Peanuts Spurgeon, of Marion, Iowa. He was taking bets he would lap me. I chased him down to the finish line and almost nosed him out." After winning in the East, he came to Los Angeles, California in 1924 and raced on the 5/8 mile Ascot track along with other venues at The Beverly Hills 1¼ mile board track, Long Beach, Emeryville, San Diego and numerous other tracks. He rode primarily Indian, JAP, Douglas, Crocker and even threw his leg over a Harley-Davidson Motorcycle during his brilliant racing career.

The biggest crowd he ever appeared before was at Syracuse, New York where 90,000 fans saw him take the nationals in 1930. Syracuse was then the Indianapolis for bike racing. The major factory teams were there, men like Jim Davis, Joe Petrali, Freddie Ludlow and Andy Hader. Miny had won there in 1929 also.

In 1931 at the Breakfast Club, was the night when short track racing started in Southern California. Miny, with his experience, was a natural over the kids at the new sport. Only Sprouts Elder stood in his way. They ran nip and tuck as top scratch riders for a while, and then Miny took the lead. Sprouts retired and for a couple of years Miny ruled the roost. When the Breakfast Club shut down, Waln retraced his steps to Richmond. Virginia. There he won two national championships at the Richmond Decoration Day race meet and returned to California shortly thereafter, where he continued to thrill speedway fans.

Waln, the first man to introduce the Comerford JAP machine into the United States, held records at practically all tracks of the western circuit. Some of the records were Oakland, Ca. 4-lap handicap record, Fresno, Ca. 4-lap scratch, Gilmore Stadium, 4-lap handicap, Atlantic Stadium 2-lap, San Diego, Ca. 1-lap title and Bakersfield Ca.; he held the 5 mile record on big track.

In all he held 15 national title medals and was a 3 time National Champion from 1930-1932. He retired from racing speedway in 1938.

The late 30’s brought on a different form of racing. Miny built midget cars and stacked up prize money with Louie Foy behind the wheel of the Dale Drake Special. He went to work for Lockheed in 1938 where he was in charge of a hydraulic crew for years and then went on to be a supervisor on final assembly and finally a test mechanic.

Throughout his career his pretty wife Gwynie was ever present at the races. She was immensely popular with the motorcycle fraternity. The great tragedy of Miny’s life was when Gwynie succumbed to a brain tumor in 1963. They had traveled the country and had been inseparable for 37 years.

Joe Walker, of Santa Ana, former Sprouts Elder Mechanic, who watched Waln race for years, observed, “Miny was one of the all-time greats. He was such a mild mannered, soft-spoken gentleman, nobody would suspect he was such a tiger in action and tough enough to take such a battering over two decades and quit in one piece.”

Miny purchased some land in a small town about 100 miles east of Los Angeles, known as Hemet, California. There he owned property that consisted mainly of apricot orchards. He raised his two daughters and retired, being close to them and his grandchildren. Miny would frequent the local tracks at the time and shared in many reunions, seeing his old friends and fellow racers at tracks that continued to prosper such as Costa Mesa Speedway. Miny passed away in 1991, but I am sure he is riding faster than he ever dreamed. A true legend in his time, he was always looking for a way to do whatever he could to outrun the competition. Godspeed Miny!












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Last edited by CarltonHendricks; 11-06-2020 at 06:20 AM.
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Old 11-06-2020, 07:34 AM
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Awesome stuff, Carlton!! Thanks for sharing...

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Old 11-06-2020, 12:14 PM
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Great tennis trophy, gong...what ever. One of the best trophy's I ever had was tennis. Probably 25 yrs ago, sold it to your buddy Herbert. The University of Arkansas has never been the same without him.
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Old 11-15-2020, 01:18 AM
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CarltonHendricks CarltonHendricks is offline
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Default Motorcycle Finds Sacramento Antiques Faire











https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...s+silent+short
Last Sunday I went to the Sacramento Antiques Faire and did very well…First I picked up a very rare 1929 movie lobby card for “Speeding Youth”…which was one “short” feature of a series called “The Collegians”…I believe they were all silent films…I found a book on-line that gives all the shorts they did…I haven’t been able to find out if the movie exists and can be seen but I did find several of the features on YouTube….see link above...But what I can tell you is in all my years collecting I had never seen or heard of this lobby card or "The Collegians" series before this...Buck Rainey in his book "Serials and Series" A World Filmography, 1912-1956, states it was probably the most popular two-reel series made in the 1920's...That was one of the best days I ever had at the Sacramento Faire!...This stuff ain't easy to find...

I did a little poking around about the actors…one of them Churchill Ross 1901-1962…the diminutive looking gentleman wearing round bookworm glasses second from right...standing behind the motorcycle with the red and white striped helmet…Many years after this lobby card he managed and was the host of Billingsley's Steak Ranch in Calabasas near Los Angeles in the late 1950’s and early 60’s…I thought it was interesting Billingsley's restaurant and motel complex was where the 1967 cult classic movie “Hot Rods To Hell” was filmed…Also…Barbara Billingsly who played Mrs. Cleaver on Leave it to Beaver was the owners wife…









Then I found a very nice motorcycle race broadside from the Sacramento area…not sure of age but think late 1940’s to 1950’s…I found news clippings that indicate racing stopped at the venue in 1957…Has a great classic look….cool red printing…I asked a gentleman who knows motorcycle racing history in Sacramento and he was kind enough to elaborate on it…see below:


QUESTIONS:
On Monday, November 9, 2020, 10:05:30 AM PST, Carlton wrote:
Richard…Thanks….If can….may I ask a few questions about this poster…
1. Are you familiar with the Selby Stables venue the race was at?....First I’ve heard of it…I only heard there were races at Slough House…and the fairgrounds…anything you can supply about Selby Stables would be great…
2. Would this have been a flat track race?...what is meant by “Field Meet”…and “TT Races”…
3. What was meant by “Dig Outs” and “Australian Pursuit”….
4. I take it from the top line that there were two main motorcycle clubs in Sacramento…”Capital City”…and “Fort Sutter”….Fort Sutter still exists…what’s the story on “Capital City”…was Capital City and bicycle club?...as I seem to recall that…
Thanks so much for your anticipated help understanding this poster…
Kindly –carlton

ANSWERS:
On Monday, November 9, 2020, 4:42 PM PST, Richard wrote:
Carlton, The Capitol City m/c was founded as an FAM club in 1914 and later turned into an AMA club. They started as a bicycle club in the late 1800's. The Fort Sutter started in 1934 as an AMA club. Capitol City was the Harley club and the Fort Sutter was the Indian club. They and the Reno M/C, Stockton M/C, San Jose M/C, and Chico M/C used to hold Field meets for friendly competition. Shelby Stables, the old Del Paso park, and Alder Creek up by Colfax were old meet sites. TT is a short race with jumps in it. Australian Pursuit is a small tight circle of members that about five a six rides race around. Digouts are real short hillclimb type runs. Jim Reed was the Indian dealer in Sacramento after Al Lauer in the early 50's and his daughter Kim Edwards is coming out with a book next spring that is all about the dealers, clubs, racers, and riders of the Sacramento area.
Richard




Also couldn't resist a Berkeley Calif Amtrak sign...very heavy...will go good in my bathroom...The Lord sure blessed my endeavor that day!!!!!...I could hardly believe no one snagged those two pieces before I got there...as I didn't find them till around 7AM...
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Last edited by CarltonHendricks; 11-15-2020 at 02:44 AM.
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Old 11-15-2020, 06:11 AM
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Always good to wake up to a new Carlton adventure -- great items and great research!

Greg
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Old 11-15-2020, 10:29 AM
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The Gas Bash looks like an American Pickers “honey hole”! Thanks for the vicarious trip (and breakfast)!
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Last edited by ooo-ribay; 11-15-2020 at 10:32 AM.
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Old 11-17-2020, 05:17 AM
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Scott Garner Scott Garner is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ooo-ribay View Post
The Gas Bash looks like an American Pickers “honey hole”! Thanks for the vicarious trip (and breakfast)!
Absolutely! I was thinking the exact same thing LOL...
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