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  #1  
Old 09-11-2020, 12:41 PM
cubman1941 cubman1941 is online now
Jim Boushley
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Default Purpose of B18 Blankets

This is from Issue 003 of Shoeless Notes, the email newsletter for the Shoeless Joe Jackson Museum and Baseball Library in Greenville, South Carolina. Maybe others knew this but I sure didn't.

"When we do find out something we never knew before, it’s such an exciting thing! To be able to share it with you, to be able to make that history come alive, it makes the hours and hours of digging through old newspaper clippings and searching through digital archives worth it. On June 11, John Thorn learned something new.

John is the Official Historian of Major League Baseball, and, without hyperbole, he probably knows more about baseball than anyone who has ever lived on this planet. The fact that even John is still learning new things proves my earlier point: it’s impossible for anyone to know everything. But John didn’t just learn something that he didn’t know… he learned something that possibly less than 10 people currently living knew. He learned what the 1914 B18 Blankets were originally intended to be.

Which takes us back to John Thorn, who was doing some reading on June 11, and came across an entry on NYHistory.org which very casually told him precisely what he didn’t even know he was looking to learn that day:
A white cotton felt cloth pen wipe, printed with a central image of a baseball player marked "Jackson", surrounded by pennants marked "Cleveland" and "A.L." for American League, with green borders decorated with purple corner blocks resembling bases, with baseball items in each block including a ball, a mitt, crossed bats and a catcher's mask. Part of a collectible series of baseball team felts given as a premium by cigar stores and manufacturers for blotting the ink from a nib pen.

So there we have it! 106 years after their creation, the world knows once again what these “blankets” were originally intended to be: pen wipes."
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  #2  
Old 09-11-2020, 12:52 PM
jjp3rd jjp3rd is offline
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Very cool. Thanks for sharing this. OK to share with others?


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  #3  
Old 09-11-2020, 01:04 PM
cubman1941 cubman1941 is online now
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Originally Posted by jjp3rd View Post
Very cool. Thanks for sharing this. OK to share with others?


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Absolutely, and you might want to go to the Shoeless Joe Jackson Museum and Baseball Library website and join to get the newsletter. NO cost.
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Old 09-11-2020, 01:06 PM
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Thank you!


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  #5  
Old 09-11-2020, 01:11 PM
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Fountain pen blotters? Why would you use felt/fabric for that instead of the heavy cardboard normally used. You'd just have ink running through it onto whatever the felt was sitting on.

When I first opened it, I expected the answer "doll house rug" or "fabric square for quilting pillows or blankets."
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  #6  
Old 09-11-2020, 01:12 PM
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Default Company that created the 1914 B18s

Christie's had an important group of documents in a lot that ended 4/5/2018, which revealed that Mercantile Novelty Co., Inc. made the B18s for American Tobacco Company.

Patrick
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  #7  
Old 09-11-2020, 01:46 PM
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Default Pen wiper

At first I didn't think it made sense that they were pen wipers, but then I looked up a definition of pen wiper:

Definitions
from The Century Dictionary.

noun A piece of rag, chamois leather, or other material used for wiping or cleaning pens after use. Pen-wipers are often made up into ornaments more or less elaborate.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.
noun A cloth, or other material, for wiping off or cleaning ink from a pen.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.
noun A cloth or other material for wiping off or cleaning ink from a pen.
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  #8  
Old 09-11-2020, 02:00 PM
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Odd in that I don't recall ever seeing one with much if any ink stains or blots. You'd think the school kids among others would have used them freely. I guess those could have been tossed as garbage, but the cynic in me makes me wonder if they were just collectibles and somebody, pressed to come up with a more useful explanation, chose ink wipers. Better that than snot rags.
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  #9  
Old 09-11-2020, 02:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buymycards View Post
At first I didn't think it made sense that they were pen wipers, but then I looked up a definition of pen wiper:

Definitions
from The Century Dictionary.

noun A piece of rag, chamois leather, or other material used for wiping or cleaning pens after use. Pen-wipers are often made up into ornaments more or less elaborate.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.
noun A cloth, or other material, for wiping off or cleaning ink from a pen.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.
noun A cloth or other material for wiping off or cleaning ink from a pen.
Thought of the leather cards reading this
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  #10  
Old 09-11-2020, 04:07 PM
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Leather cards perhaps used to assist in opening jars and the like
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  #11  
Old 09-11-2020, 07:12 PM
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At one time I was close to completing this set and thumbed through quite a few stacks. And it seemed that most stacks had a few that were washed out. So maybe these were the ones used to clean pens and then were washed to use again?
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  #12  
Old 09-11-2020, 08:06 PM
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This surprises me too. Like the silks, I thought these were made to display or sew together. I also thought what Todd did - odd that there aren't a bunch with ink stains on them.

I have a cabinet photo that shows several B18s sewn together to make a pillow. This doesn't mean they couldn't have been repurposed ink blotters, but I would like to see the source material for the ink blotter claim.
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File Type: jpg B18 Blanket Cabinet Photo.jpg (77.3 KB, 551 views)
File Type: jpg B18 Blanket Cabinet Photo - Crop 1000 DPI.jpg (8.1 KB, 535 views)
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Old 09-11-2020, 09:09 PM
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That's a really cool photo. I've been working on this set for some time. The ink blotter theory is interesting, however, I just don't see it. I don't see any with ink stains that would support this thinking. As for washing, not a chance. As soon as you get them wet the ink bleeds. Just my simple thinking. Regardless, I love the set.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jobu View Post
This surprises me too. Like the silks, I thought these were made to display or sew together. I also thought what Todd did - odd that there aren't a bunch with ink stains on them.

I have a cabinet photo that shows several B18s sewn together to make a pillow. This doesn't mean they couldn't have been repurposed ink blotters, but I would like to see the source material for the ink blotter claim.
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  #14  
Old 09-11-2020, 10:27 PM
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Default great eye

Great eye for that pickup on the cabinet! Probably sat in an antique store for years without anyone noticing! Wonder if the girl in the photo knew that years from now we would be discussing how wonderful the picture is but because of the pillow on the chair!!!! LOL

Last edited by NiceDocter; 09-11-2020 at 10:28 PM. Reason: LOL
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  #15  
Old 09-12-2020, 12:56 AM
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I always assumed that the B-18 blankets were meant to be drooled upon.

Brian
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  #16  
Old 09-12-2020, 04:46 AM
cubman1941 cubman1941 is online now
Jim Boushley
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jobu View Post
This surprises me too. Like the silks, I thought these were made to display or sew together. I also thought what Todd did - odd that there aren't a bunch with ink stains on them.

I have a cabinet photo that shows several B18s sewn together to make a pillow. This doesn't mean they couldn't have been repurposed ink blotters, but I would like to see the source material for the ink blotter claim.
This is the source material. I also just joined John Thorn's blog site:

"Shoeless Notes - Issue 003
September 11, 2020

Hello and welcome to Issue 003 of Shoeless Notes, the email newsletter for the Shoeless Joe Jackson Museum and Baseball Library in Greenville, South Carolina.

When we do find out something we never knew before, it’s such an exciting thing! To be able to share it with you, to be able to make that history come alive, it makes the hours and hours of digging through old newspaper clippings and searching through digital archives worth it. On June 11, John Thorn learned something new.
John is the Official Historian of Major League Baseball, and, without hyperbole, he probably knows more about baseball than anyone who has ever lived on this planet. The fact that even John is still learning new things proves my earlier point: it’s impossible for anyone to know everything. But John didn’t just learn something that he didn’t know… he learned something that possibly less than 10 people currently living knew. He learned what the 1914 B18 Blankets were originally intended to be.
Let me back up, because that last sentence probably doesn’t mean a whole heck of a lot to most of you, and the rest of this newsletter is going to go a lot better for everyone if we’re all on the same page! Back in the early days of baseball cards, card sets would often times have designations such as B18 or N162. One of the most famous card sets of all time, which features one of the most famous cards of all time, is the T206 set which was produced from 1909 to 1911. If you’ve ever heard anyone mention the Honus Wagner card that has sold for millions of dollars, they’re talking about his T206. There wasn’t a rhyme or reason to the lettering or numbering of those sets, it was just a way to tell them apart.
In 1914, a unique “card” set was introduced, which has become known as the B18 set. But the cards were not made of a paper-like material, as most other cards had been before it, and as most have been since. The B18s were felt squares measuring approximately 5 ¼" on each side with a dark brown border all the way around. They started getting included as part of tobacco packages, most notably in ones with the brand name of Egyptienne Straights Cigarettes.
A common way baseball cards were distributed in the early days was in packs of cigarettes, and often times the cigarette companies would have advertisements on the back of the card. In fact, the reason Honus Wagner’s T206 card is so valuable was due to Wagner’s objection to a cigarette ad being on the back of his card. Wagner demanded that the American Tobacco Company pull his card from circulation, which made them super rare, and since he is an all-time great, a graded example can now fetch 7 figures.

If you’d like to read a more in-depth history of the B18 set, read THIS PIECE by Jeffrey Obermeyer, which he wrote in 2009
The method of delivery for the B18s was nothing new, but the size and material of these “cards” was different than almost anything that had been seen before. They became known as “blankets” over the years, and nobody really seemed to know why. One working theory was that they were just like tiny blankets, themselves. Another theory was that the name was due to the fact that people would collect as many as they could, and either sew them directly together to create a blanket, or stitch them onto other patches of fabric and create quilts.
The B18 set had 90 different baseball players represented, including nine from each of ten different major league teams. Five of the teams were from the National League (Boston, Brooklyn, New York, Pittsburgh, and St. Louis), and five were from the American League (Cleveland, Detroit, New York, St. Louis, and Washington). There were 16 teams in major league baseball at the time, but why the other six were left out of this set will likely forever remain a mystery.
Of the 90 players represented in the B18 set, nine became Hall of Famers: Max Carey, Frank Chance, Ty Cobb, Miller Huggins, Walter Johnson, Rabbit Maranville, Casey Stengel, Bobby Wallace and Zach Wheat. Other notable players featured in the set include Fred Snodgrass, Ray Chapman, Chick Gandil, and our very own Shoeless Joe Jackson.
Joe’s blanket had two different variants, each of which are shown above. One had purple basepaths and yellow bases, and the other had green basepaths and purple bases. The purple basepath version is the rarer of the two, and therefore the more valuable, though both are incredibly sought-after.

The original photograph which inspired the image on Joe’s B18 blanket was taken by George Grantham Bain (likely on March 23, 1914 at Cleveland’s spring-training site in Athens, Georgia)
Which takes us back to John Thorn, who was doing some reading on June 11, and came across an entry on NYHistory.org which very casually told him precisely what he didn’t even know he was looking to learn that day:
A white cotton felt cloth pen wipe, printed with a central image of a baseball player marked "Jackson", surrounded by pennants marked "Cleveland" and "A.L." for American League, with green borders decorated with purple corner blocks resembling bases, with baseball items in each block including a ball, a mitt, crossed bats and a catcher's mask. Part of a collectible series of baseball team felts given as a premium by cigar stores and manufacturers for blotting the ink from a nib pen.
So there we have it! 106 years after their creation, the world knows once again what these “blankets” were originally intended to be: pen wipes. "
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  #17  
Old 09-12-2020, 05:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cubman1941 View Post
There wasn’t a rhyme or reason to the lettering or numbering of those sets, it was just a way to tell them apart.

Part of a collectible series of baseball team felts given as a premium by cigar stores and manufacturers for blotting the ink from a nib pen.
So there we have it! 106 years after their creation, the world knows once again what these “blankets” were originally intended to be: pen wipes. "
Still don't have a period source; that's just a modern attribution, as far as I can tell. All of their tobacco felts are listed as "pen wipes", with the disclaimer that "Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change."
May be right, may be wrong. But the article writer's quote I bolded is incorrect. The letters have meanings, and the numbers are grouped in such a way that they also have meaning, just like the numbers in the Dewey Decimal system have meaning.

Here's my counterpoint. They declare the national flag blankets as pen wipes as well.
https://www.nyhistory.org/exhibit/pen-wipe-tobacco-82


Quote:
Pen wipe/ tobacco
OBJECT NUMBER:
2002.1.2852
DATE:
1912-1930
MEDIUM:
Cloth
DIMENSIONS:
11 3/4 x 8 1/4 in.
DESCRIPTION:
A brown cotton felt cloth pen wipe, printed with a 48 star American flag, with a red and blue border decorated with ribbons, swags and striped shields with a brown border. Part of a series of Flags of the World given as a premium by cigar stores and manufacturers for blotting the ink from a nib pen.
CREDIT LINE:
Gift of Bella C. Landauer
Does anyone believe that in 1910 an American company printed a US flag on an item meant to clean soot off a fountain pen? I remember how much outrage bathing suits printed with American Flag symbology were causing back in the 1980s. Making an item intended to be soiled and then thrown away depicting an American Flag a hundred years ago would have been ridiculous. I would say the labeling on nyhistory.org is lazy and the article writer's republishing that attribution as some kind of fact is also lazy.
Weren't many of these items redemptions as well from coupons or order booklets? There should be some paper trail if these were manufactured with the intent of being pen wipes.
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Last edited by swarmee; 09-12-2020 at 05:14 AM.
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  #18  
Old 09-12-2020, 08:42 AM
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Default hmmmmm

Don't buy it at all. First nothing to do with cigars so makes what's said less credible? Second - without the felts manufacturer or possibly something from the ATC - no way were they pen wipes even if someone used one in that matter once or twice. On coupons and trade card type paper - it's been clearly stated that it's use was for the home honey to create household items. I have a folder showing all the things that could be done with them - pictures plenty of sewn items - no mention of a pen blotter. While I'm sure as a baseball historian he brings a lot to the table - sometimes supposition replaces fact.
I'm rarely right about anything - just ask my wife. However until I see something contemporaneous in print - ink blotter a HUGE stretch. I actually have a few blotters in my accumulation. 1930's-1950's their "hey day" and ostensibly made of a porous paper.
I would LOVE to see an actual reference as the utilitarian and/or practical uses in either situation are not mutually exclusive. Come over to the non-sport side (link at top) and let's discuss it. We have a couple of experts in the field that would be happy to explore and discuss the issue even though the S/L/B category gets little respect.

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Old 09-12-2020, 08:53 AM
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I don't think I've ever seen a blotter that didn't have a company attribution....
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Old 09-12-2020, 11:51 AM
forbesrs forbesrs is offline
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Default Ummmm, no B18's were not made to be used as pen blotters

As background, I co-authored the book American Tobacco Cards and have completed the manuscript for another book on American tobacco silks, flannels, and leathers. My specialty is 1900-1920 tobacco.

As a collector I have a ton of reference material, catalogs, etc., as well as the silks and flannels themselves.

I can categorically state that the tobacco flannels were NOT originally produced to be used as pen blotters. They were produced to be used in quilts, decorations, tablecloths, etc., but there was never any intent to produce these for wiping pens. The fact that someone may have at some point used one of the flannels as a pen blotter (while tragic for that example) does not prove anything. I have handled thousands of tobacco flannels and have never seen one example with ink on it in any type of pattern as you would get when wiping a pen.

This falls into the category of urban legend - sounds interesting but has absolutely no basis in fact.

As a note, B18s are flannel, not felt. Flannel & felt are two distinctly different materials. Burdick named the "B" category "Blankets, Rugs, Cloth Items" for the tobacco inserts and premiums which were made out of flannel, plush, and a couple of other types of material. I am not certain whether Burdick originated the term or whether others in the early hobby (1930's) called these items blankets, but Burdick used the term in his American Card Catalog: ("B" is for blanket...). The BF2 Baseball Players are on felt. (non-tobacco).

There is a distinct logical system in the "B" section of the ACC, with divisions made by type of material, whether fringed or not, and size. Not perfect, but a pretty good organization of this category of tobacco collectibles.

Bob Forbes
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Old 09-12-2020, 12:18 PM
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I don’t buy it either. Especially as it more broadly applies to novelty “rugs” in general. I want to read something printed by the tobacco company at that time explaining the purpose or intent of their marketing scheme. To that point, I’m fresh back from the teens having spent the last hour reading Egyptienne Straights Cigarettes newspaper ads. Lots of print material between 1913-14. Very little before or after. They were really loud about their blankets, rugs, and other bonus novelty items. Highly proud and patriotic about their large U.S. flag giveaways. They advertised that the flags were in “high demand” and “the ladies have found so many uses for them”. What I find very interesting is that there is absolutely no mention or advertising (at least that I could find) related to the issuance of the B18 baseball flannels. For a company that shouted so loudly about Navajo blankets…why no mention of America’s national sport?

Jeff

Various supporting ads –
Attached Images
File Type: jpg ESC 1913 Rug Ad.jpg (64.5 KB, 431 views)
File Type: jpg ESC 1913 Rug Brooch Ad.jpg (80.9 KB, 432 views)
File Type: jpg ESC 1913 Rug Navajo Ad.jpg (87.6 KB, 436 views)
File Type: jpg ESC 1913 Pepsin Gum Ad.jpg (71.6 KB, 426 views)
File Type: jpg ESC 1914 Ad.jpg (78.7 KB, 430 views)
File Type: jpg Flag News Clip 1914.jpg (53.9 KB, 427 views)
File Type: jpg ESC Flag Size Change June 1914.jpg (64.3 KB, 432 views)
File Type: jpg Tango Tie Clasp 1914.jpg (51.7 KB, 431 views)
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  #22  
Old 09-12-2020, 01:28 PM
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I have to agree. Is it possible that that was the original intention by the manufacturer? I suppose...though they certainly were't used that way. I have only ever seen paper ink blotters, as well as not a single B18 with localized ink stains that made me think, "that must have been used to clean a pen".
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File Type: jpg IMG-2160.jpg (19.5 KB, 420 views)
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  #23  
Old 09-12-2020, 01:32 PM
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All the recent input on this thread reconfirms my original drooling thoughts.

Brian
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  #24  
Old 09-12-2020, 01:37 PM
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So, let's wrap this up with the following:

#BUSTED for the Mythbusters fans

or

#fakenews
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Old 09-12-2020, 01:49 PM
cubman1941 cubman1941 is online now
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Just so everyone knows - I have sent the author a note saying all the conclusions are that his conclusion was wrong. I suggested he look at our site and this post.
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Old 09-12-2020, 02:19 PM
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Thanks. I would think people who are paid to do museum work and/or write articles would be much more thorough in their research in the future.
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Old 09-12-2020, 02:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by swarmee View Post
Thanks. I would think people who are paid to do museum work and/or write articles would be much more thorough in their research in the future.
I can't speak to whether anyone involved in this theory is paid or a volunteer, but I think it's probably safe to say we have all passed on something we've read as fact, at some point, without any further research. I personally enjoy discussing/debating other theories.
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Last edited by conor912; 09-12-2020 at 02:30 PM.
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Old 09-12-2020, 02:34 PM
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Originally Posted by conor912 View Post
I can't speak to whether anyone involved in this theory is paid or a volunteer, but I think it's probably safe to say we have all passed on something we've read as fact, at some point, without any further research. I personally enjoy discussing/debating other theories.
Yeah, but I also expect grading card companies to detect alterations they promise they can, so who knows. People just cash paychecks, I guess. No pride in ownership. I know I can't do that at my job.
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  #29  
Old 09-12-2020, 02:42 PM
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I hear you....I guess my point was that it matters (at least IMO), if he's paid or not. I agree that if he is, the bar should be a lot higher.
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  #30  
Old 09-12-2020, 02:47 PM
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I saw the original post on twitter some months back, and the one today, and I said both times, that I don't buy it. I would want to see some provenance.

Back during that time, they had fountain pens (pens with a reservoir), and nib pens (sometimes called dip pens). You don't want to use fabric to help clean off a fountain pen because the fabric strands can get into the capillary system and clog it up. Paper--or today, paper towels--is a good way to get the excess ink off the pen when you're done using it, which you want to do because the excess ink can potentially clog the system or cause a mess.

It wouldn't be the first time a historical society or museum screwed up something like this. We only have to look at the location of the Baseball Hall of Fame, and Doubleday Field for an example (although, as we know, that was done deliberately).
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Old 09-12-2020, 09:44 PM
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It's really common for general antiques people to label something in a way that matches either similar things they've seen, or as similar things that are currently popular.

My mom- when she still could collected egg cups. Over the years they went in and out of popularity.
When they were popular, other stuff that didn't have a clear use and was about the right size would get called an egg cup. Like toothpick holders, partial salt cellers, And if they were currently very popular shot glasses and eye cups....

When they were unpopular, and tooth pick holders were popular many became toothpick holders.

That works for lots of other stuff. Like a hand crank apple peeler becomes a pencil sharpener. Early! Rare! .....and totally NOT a pencil sharpener..

The writer is probably familiar with some form of pen wiper, so every cloth promotional item about that size is to them a pen wiper.
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Old 09-12-2020, 10:19 PM
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Craig, Rocky - glad to see you find this photo to be as fun as I do!

I tried to get a bigger and darker image of the pillow for a closer look (just checking for ink stains ).
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Old 09-12-2020, 11:08 PM
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Default Flag Blankets

Im suspicious that they were pen wipes as a quick ebay search revealed very few with ink stains (logically it stands to reason if that was the intended use there would be a lot).

Also the here is an ad from 1914 for the Sovereign Cigarettes "Flag Blankets"...no mention of blotter or ink anywhere in the ad that I can see (4-5-1914 The News and Observer, Raleigh, NC)
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Old 09-12-2020, 11:11 PM
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nevermind it was too big to upload I guess, but the citation is there for you to look up the ad for the Flag Blankets
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Old 09-13-2020, 04:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThomasL View Post
nevermind it was too big to upload I guess, but the citation is there for you to look up the ad for the Flag Blankets
They've already been posted in Post 21.
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Old 09-13-2020, 03:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jobu View Post
Craig, Rocky - glad to see you find this photo to be as fun as I do! I tried to get a bigger and darker image of the pillow for a closer look (just checking for ink stains ).
Such a cool photo, Bryan, wonderful to see "our stuff" in contemporaneous images.
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Old 09-13-2020, 05:17 PM
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I have one with an ink blot - I always wondered why, so the explanation makes sense to me
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Old 09-13-2020, 06:10 PM
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The purpose of B18 Blankets was to annoy auction writers 100 years later.
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Old 09-13-2020, 06:34 PM
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I have handled several thousand B18 blankets. Have never seen one with ink marks. However, I've seen hundreds with stitch markings, ya know, for blankets!
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Old 09-15-2020, 05:48 PM
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Default peckinpaugh ink blot

Here is my blanket with an ink blot.
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Old 09-15-2020, 05:50 PM
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1st one I've ever seen. Thanks Buzz
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  #42  
Old 09-15-2020, 07:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BuzzD View Post
Here is my blanket with an ink blot.
Maybe that one was used for that, but how many T206s and other old cards have we seen with ink spots? I don't think anybody would claim those cards were made for that purpose, and I don't think B-18s were, either. I'm with Orioles54, if they were invented with a particular purpose in mind, it was to be sewn together for a blanket, pillowcase, or throw. Or maybe the inventor had this diamond in mind for the nine players on each team:
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Old 09-15-2020, 09:40 PM
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for what it is worth...which is nothing...

I would argue there was no intended purpose for the "blankets" other than to help sell tobacco products and in particularly sell to younger demographics.

Im sure a few used them as ink blotters as I think blotters were in high demand especially in school settings (at least reading some news articles I saw from 1914).

I saw no mention of "ink" or "blotter" for the Flag "Blankets" in 1914 ads or articles.

Seems to me the B18s would be made for the same reasons and logically it would be simply as a collectible/incentive in order to boost sales.

I will add I love the Shoeless Notes and see nothing wrong with their twist/take playing off John Thorn's insight. Keep up the good work over there guys if yall are reading this.
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Old 09-16-2020, 08:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThomasL View Post
for what it is worth...which is nothing...

I would argue there was no intended purpose for the "blankets" other than to help sell tobacco products and in particularly sell to younger demographics.

Im sure a few used them as ink blotters as I think blotters were in high demand especially in school settings (at least reading some news articles I saw from 1914).

I saw no mention of "ink" or "blotter" for the Flag "Blankets" in 1914 ads or articles.

Seems to me the B18s would be made for the same reasons and logically it would be simply as a collectible/incentive in order to boost sales.

I will add I love the Shoeless Notes and see nothing wrong with their twist/take playing off John Thorn's insight. Keep up the good work over there guys if yall are reading this.
+1
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Old Yesterday, 07:53 AM
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Default My new ink blotter

7 1/2' x 44". 24 B7's and 4 B5's.
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  #46  
Old Yesterday, 05:14 PM
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Alright.... ink blotter? I'm not convinced. I've seen several white border cards and Goudey cards with ink spots, marks and blobs on them... haven't seen a B18 with that. I've seen a few that looks like a border was trimmed into the card a bit (which I figured was done after distribution because it was slightly diagonal from the square corners). Are we gonna see someone say that our old ball cards were blotters, no... I'm not convinced about this blotter idea. One of us has such a B18, but there are hundreds of B18's in our hands and we only have ONE? I'm not convinced. Convincible, yes; but some contemporary print description would sell that to me.
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